Upgrading An Insufficient Load Bearing Wall

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Old 04-20-11, 12:36 AM
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Upgrading An Insufficient Load Bearing Wall

We had a contractor install a new Anderson sliding door 4 years ago and I remember him telling me he had to trim the studs to allow the door to fit in the rough opening. Currently we are remodeling our downstairs and removed the drywall and were surprised to see only single 1” wide jack studs supporting the 4x12 header above the door. There is a large second floor master bath with a mudded tile floor and a large two-person tub directly above that cantilevers out the back. I ran a string and the center of the two top plates deflects almost a 1/2” over a 6’ span in the middle. The load on this header must be substantial and even single unripped 2x4 jack studs would be insufficient for the load



I don’t see anything I can do to correct this situation except to fur out a properly sized load-bearing wall in front of the existing exterior wall. I would like to support the 2x12 floor joists above with a 4x12 Parallam. I would carry the load down to the foundation wall using 4x6 posts and building up the sill plate under the subfloor. See drawing below.



Does anyone see a problem with this approach?

Thanks for taking the time to read my post.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 04:22 AM
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Agreed, the jack "should" have been doubled, then a king, but I see they installed it with some constraints. No excuse, just didn't do it properly. The header should have been at least 6-8" longer than the opening, resting on the jacks.
However, although your plan is rock solid (ie overkill but good overkill), what are your plans for the plumbing pipe to the right as well as the electrical on both sides. They may be in the way, and not allow you full extension on the right side. I have to ask, also, what is that red tape on the cabling on the right? Surely not a splice.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Agreed, the jack "should" have been doubled, then a king, but I see they installed it with some constraints. No excuse, just didn't do it properly. The header should have been at least 6-8" longer than the opening, resting on the jacks.
However, although your plan is rock solid (ie overkill but good overkill), what are your plans for the plumbing pipe to the right as well as the electrical on both sides. They may be in the way, and not allow you full extension on the right side. I have to ask, also, what is that red tape on the cabling on the right? Surely not a splice.
Thank you for your comments.

On the right I will move the 2” drain to the new outer sole plate and move the electrical box out to the new outer stud wall. The 4x6 post will have full support all the way to the foundation, but I will not be adding additional support under the door opening. The outdoor electrical on the left is going away.

Regarding the red tape around the Romex, the electrician who did some work 16 years ago just taped excess wire together.


I have the following questions for you.

What would be the best method to tie the new support wall to the existing framing at the outside corner?






What would be the best method to tie the new support wall to the existing framing at the inside corner?




 
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Old 04-21-11, 08:35 AM
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I should have read your post more closely. You plan on adding to the thickness of the wall by adding a support wall. Next question. Is this a basement, or is the plywood flooring deceiving me? If there is a floor below, then the support must carry completely to the bottom floor into poured footings. Your methodology is good, and you won't have to move that drain line if all you are doing is adding a wall thickness with header support.
The wall will tie itself back into the outside corner if you make an "L" of the last studs.
 
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Old 04-30-11, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
I should have read your post more closely. You plan on adding to the thickness of the wall by adding a support wall. Next question. Is this a basement, or is the plywood flooring deceiving me? If there is a floor below, then the support must carry completely to the bottom floor into poured footings. Your methodology is good, and you won't have to move that drain line if all you are doing is adding a wall thickness with header support.
The wall will tie itself back into the outside corner if you make an "L" of the last studs.

Hi Chandler,

I have been out of commission and not been able to get any work done or post for over a week after an eye injury and severe knee pain.

I will be carrying the load down to the foundation wall using 4x6 posts above the plywood subfloor and building up the sill plate under the subfloor. See small side drawing in my first post. How should I tie the new 2x4 support wall to the inside corner intersection of the existing 2x4 and 2x6 stud walls?

Thanks

Howard


 
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Old 04-30-11, 01:54 PM
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Build an inside corner. I can do it faster than I can tell you, but here goes. Nail short 10" or so scraps to a 2x4 flat with space between them, say 5 or 6 of them, then nail a 2x4 on top of the scraps. What you will have is a 2x4 sandwich with pieces in the middle. Offset a full length 2x4 so it covers one of your other 2x4's and the row of scraps and nail it home. Now you have an inside corner. Stand it up on your plate and you will have a nailing surface for your interior wall covering.

pix from extreme how to.

If you are terminating that wall and not turning it, just install a stud so it abuts the 4x6 making a corner. The stud will go into the old wall and against the back edge of the 4x6
 
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Old 04-30-11, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Build an inside corner. I can do it faster than I can tell you, but here goes. Nail short 10" or so scraps to a 2x4 flat with space between them, say 5 or 6 of them, then nail a 2x4 on top of the scraps. What you will have is a 2x4 sandwich with pieces in the middle. Offset a full length 2x4 so it covers one of your other 2x4's and the row of scraps and nail it home. Now you have an inside corner. Stand it up on your plate and you will have a nailing surface for your interior wall covering.

pix from extreme how to.

If you are terminating that wall and not turning it, just install a stud so it abuts the 4x6 making a corner. The stud will go into the old wall and against the back edge of the 4x6

Thanks, but I don’t see how to nail the 4x6 post to the 2x6 sandwich that needs to be created in the 2x6 wall. Your figure shows 2x wood being nailed to the 2x a sandwich.
 
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Old 04-30-11, 03:28 PM
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Are you turning the corner? Your pictures shows the wall dying into the 2x6 wall with a 4x6. If the latter is true, all you would need to do is install a stud to create an inside corner at the junction where the 4x6 meets the 2x6 wall. Maybe I am not understanding what you are doing. I'm trying to draw in paint and I can't get it to stay with my response.
 
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Old 04-30-11, 03:51 PM
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I think this is what he means. The view is from the top and the red is the new material.

Drawing1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 
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Old 04-30-11, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
I think this is what he means. The view is from the top and the red is the new material.

Drawing1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Drooplug, your drawing is exactly what I am doing except currently there is only one 2x6 installed in the corner where your drawing shows three 2x6 plus a 2x6 nailer for the drywall on the other side of the 4x6.
 
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Old 04-30-11, 04:35 PM
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Drooplug....stay out of my computer!! That is exactly my drawing! Thanks for posting it. Sequoia, it won't matter about the corner studs. The important one you will need is on the 4x6 to form a corner. You do have 3 2x6's in the corner, or at least two with filler.
 

Last edited by chandler; 04-30-11 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 04-30-11, 05:31 PM
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I have read over the thread again to make sure I understand what you are looking for as far as information. I think your latest question hasn't been directly answered: "How should I tie the new 2x4 support wall to the inside corner intersection of the existing 2x4 and 2x6 stud walls?" You don't need to tie into the existing corner with your new wall. Your new wall will be secured to the ceiling and to the flooring.
 
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Old 05-01-11, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
I have read over the thread again to make sure I understand what you are looking for as far as information. I think your latest question hasn't been directly answered: "How should I tie the new 2x4 support wall to the inside corner intersection of the existing 2x4 and 2x6 stud walls?" You don't need to tie into the existing corner with your new wall. Your new wall will be secured to the ceiling and to the flooring.
Drooplug,

Thank you. That was the answer I was looking for. I knew how to tie in the top to the ceiling joist and the bottom into the floor, but I did not know how to tie in the interesting walls.
 
 

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