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Repairing Damaged Exterior Wall: Rotted Bottom Plate, Some Stud Damage

Repairing Damaged Exterior Wall: Rotted Bottom Plate, Some Stud Damage

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  #1  
Old 09-20-11, 10:57 AM
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Repairing Damaged Exterior Wall: Rotted Bottom Plate, Some Stud Damage

We are attempting to repair water and ant damage to an exterior wall. I need some assistance with best methods and supporting properly.

This section of the house is an addition that was once a covered porch. We believe this addition was done in the late 70's or early 80's. The portion in question is the north east corner of what was a 12' x 75' porch. The span in question is about 17' long. Single story, pitched roof (8' to 10.5', rafters on 24" centers with 16" rafter tail above the soffit).

5 Segments, working in sections. See images. Please note, all lumber to be used to replace old is pressure treated and the exterior of the house will be properly sealed this time, with the new sidewalk placed at a proper slope for drainage, a gutter installed, and no water (or ice) will pool at the exterior going forward.

Questions

Segment 1: This is the corner of the addition. The studs and bottom plate were badly damaged. I'd like to repair by nailing two 2x8's together, with a 2x4 on top and then toenail the existing studs to the block. Using PT header stock, is this acceptable? This section is 32" long.





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Segment 2: The bottom plate is rotted but the studs are fine. I have erected a temp wall to support the roof so that I can cut the bottom plate out and replace, but I'm not certain the temp wall is sufficient. I believe this portion of the wall (2x6 framing) was constructed and then raised, as there are no toenails in the studs. I do not know whether they nailed the bottom plate into the concrete. If not (which I suspect it wasn't), I'd like to simply cut the nails between the plate and studs, butt up the new plate to the old, and slide the new in, old out. Then, toenail the existing studs into place. Is this reasonable? This segment is 54" in length, with a window and I suspect a continuous header that runs this whole span, over the door, and across a mirrored span of 54" on the other side of the door.

If the bottom plate actually is anchored to the concrete, what is my best method?

Do I need to create support on the exterior (under the rafter tails and soffit) too? The ground here is very soft as we have removed the damaged concrete.






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Segment 3: The door jamb is a joke and will be entirely replaced with a new prehung door, but this will come after the entire wall is repaired.





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Segment 4: The section is the same as segment 2, but the damage is much less severe. The 2x4 that frames the door is somewhat damaged and I'm not certain what to do there, add a cripple? Cut out damage and.... I can't brace on both sides because one side is the door.

The bottom plate damage here only spans the first distance between the door and next stud, plus an inch to equal approx 14". Can I just remove the damaged plate and slide in new chunk? I'm not sure what the best solution here is.









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Segment 5: This portion is similar to segment 1. It is 32" of 2x4 framing that the bottom plate was all but non-existent. I have two 2x4's stacked for temp support at the moment. See image for additional notes. To solve this, I'd like to simply nail two PT 2x4's stacked and use that as the bottom plate, toenailing the studs in place.





 
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  #2  
Old 09-21-11, 05:51 AM
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The damage doesn't look any where near as bad as what you described. I think you maybe doing more work than is needed. If you hit the "rotted bottom plate" with a hammer, what happens? Does it do any damage to it?
 
  #3  
Old 09-21-11, 07:41 AM
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Where it's dry, it flakes off by touching. Where wet, imprints with a hammer smash it like warm wax, and I can break off chunks of wood with my fingers.

To say nothing of the dirt the ants impregnated it with.

It's rotted and weak.
 
  #4  
Old 09-21-11, 02:57 PM
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In that case, replace what's bad. The temp wall looks good.
 
  #5  
Old 09-21-11, 03:07 PM
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Continuous plate or can I do it in sections? Any advice on the various solutions I've mentioned concerning the two 2x8's with a 2x4 on top for segment 1, the two 2x4's for segment 5? Other thoughts? Something I'm overlooking? This wall seems to be rather under built (I can't see the corner entirely, but I think it's a block (three 2x4's) that connects to a 4x4 horizontal post at the ceiling line.
 
  #6  
Old 09-21-11, 04:17 PM
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Continuous is always better, if you can do it. Since you aren't building from scratch, it maybe hard.

The second photo shows the bottom plate on edge. I've never seen that before. I think it would be better to install the proper plate & the right size studs instead of the 2x8s with the 2x4 on top.

Using the double 2x4 where the outlets are should be fine.
 
  #7  
Old 09-23-11, 08:19 PM
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Whole House Renovation, Small Portion - Exterior Wall Repair, Rotted Base Plate

Just an update -

We have completed segments 1 & 2. Our wall is now much stronger and safer than it has likely ever been. It's also much more insulated on the lower portions.

We went ahead with Segment 1 being repaired by two 2x6's (PT) nailed together, with a 2x4 turned perpendicular and nailed to the top, then sliding it in place under the existing 2x4 studs. It's spectacularly solid, and I've now braced each of the studs within both segments with blocks at various places to help square up the wall too (it was never attached to the concrete, and it's always been a weak point, especially at the door).

Segment 2, the near 5' section replacement of the existing rotted plate, was also a success. We cut the nails on the existing studs, sawing in the tiny space where the vertical stud meets the bottom plate, careful to remove no wood from the vertical stud. The plate we replaced the old rotted non-PT piece with is pressure treated wood; as such it's thickness is a slight bit greater than what was there, so the fit is snug and exactly right.

The door isn't quite right yet, especially now with the wall actually plumb and all... but that's ok because we are replacing the entire door and jamb with a prehung unit. We don't have the door yet and will complete Segment 4 & 5 before turning our focus on the door. I hope to have the unit within the next week and can't wait to get it installed, sealed up, and working as a door is meant to (something not possible with the existing door) - just in time for the cold.

Tomorrow (or maybe Monday), we'll slide in the two 2x4's for Segment 5, leaving the new bottom plate chunk unattached to the studs, just as we have done with Segment 1, until the entire wall is complete. Segment 4 requires just 14" of bottom plate replacement, but adjoins the rotted door jamb, so making sure it is plumb to true is necessary (just as Segment 2 required). Once we have the new door in place, we'll attach the two corner 32" segments to the bottom plate configurations (#1 and #5) and will be finished.

Rehang some sheetrock, cut and place some plywood for a backer for a barnwood lower (like beadboard to 4', only old barnwood), and locate someone who enjoys killing their knees installing carpet... Then we're really done. With this room.
 
  #8  
Old 09-23-11, 08:29 PM
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Any specific advice for Segment 4? This chunk of bottom plate will be a snap, but I am not sure what to do with the vertical stud that is all but missing up about 5" from the concrete. Thoughts? See original post for image.
 
  #9  
Old 09-24-11, 04:27 AM
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Cut out the offending length (5"+), replace it, and lay in a sister , fastening it securely to the old stud and the piece you put in. Make the sister as long as feasible. Full length would be happy, but sometimes wiring, etc. gets in the way.
 
  #10  
Old 09-30-11, 09:57 PM
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Well, 14" Was Hopeful

Yesterday I took off the siding on a hunch after seeing a bit of the end of Segment 4's bottom plate. Guess what. The originally mentioned 14" right next to the door is just the beginning. The entire plate is rotted, and worse than Segment 2 (other side of the door, and my assumption of the most damage).

I removed the damaged wood and have replaced everything (including some vertical stud damage) and will tomorrow attach OSB to the exterior (under the siding). The wall was constructed originally with only the Masonite siding as a wrap, with foil covered Styrofoam something (toxic, I'm sure) and Fiberglass batt insulation, then the sheetrock and barnwood trim/wainscoting. The wall and door have always been weak, so we're fixing that.

Just for fun, here are some images of current progress. Now, I have an issue with the Hammer Ramset... It won't fire and I can't unload because somehow I managed to jam it and can't get the barrel open to dispose of the charge (which is still active, and the nail is still in the gun).

This image is one of the less damaged chunks we pulled out.


Fun.


One might ask why I was so rough when taking out the chunk attached to all the now missing concrete.. Thing is, the wood came out, the concrete hole appeared, but no concrete (not even dust) was to be seen. Ants take it?? I have no clue where the material that was once there is now, but it isn't anymore.
 
  #11  
Old 10-06-11, 10:04 PM
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Hard telling what happened to the missing concrete. I've come across both carbonation and sulphate action as severe forms of concrete deterioration in a few of the structures I've inspected, but usually there's always a trace of something left (like small chunks of aggregate, or at least a white powder). Could have been a large void in the pour, and they framed right over it while no one was looking.

Looks like you're doing a good job with the renovation. It's very satisfying to take something that was wrong and make it right, isn't it? Been there, done that, many a time.
 
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