Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Please help me confirm that this wall is not a load bearing wall


BrettM's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5
MI

09-26-11, 07:13 PM   #1  
Please help me confirm that this wall is not a load bearing wall

Hello,

I am remodeling my bathroom, and there is a partition wall with a doorway that I want to remove completely. I was confident that it was not load bearing at first, but found that it has a header. My home does not have gable traditional trusses (it has cathedral ceilings), but the wall in question does not line up with the center of the home where there would be weight distributed.

The bathroom is on the second floor. There are no corresponding load-bearing walls in the basement below the bathroom. Here is a pic of the wall:

http://i.imgur.com/v4vN6.jpg

Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

 
Sponsored Links
tldoug's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 317
NM

09-26-11, 09:00 PM   #2  
Spend a few bucks. Get and architect or an engineer to look at the structure. Either your house is really overbuilt or there is a reason why it is built that way. I suspect the latter, but your picture is useless to make a determination.

 
BrettM's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5
MI

09-27-11, 07:27 AM   #3  
Thanks for the reply. I've contacted a structural engineer and we'll see what happens.

 
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,196
OR

10-06-11, 09:24 PM   #4  
Brett,

I'm an engineer, and would like to offer a few comments. The engineer you hire will make a point of determining if your roof rafters require intermediate support, or are able to adequately span from wall to ridge by themselves. He'll ask if you have any construction plans for the house, and lacking that, will try to determine the makeup, spacing and species of the rafters themselves. The fact that the wall in question has a header over the door means nothing (in terms of it being load-bearing or not). Are there adjacent areas (of cathedral ceilings) that have no intermediate supports for the rafter runs? Should that be the case, chances are very good that your wall is not load-bearing. Especially if there isn't a wall on the first floor, directly under and in line with it.

Should it turn out that the wall is load-bearing, it's not the end of the world. It can be replaced, using proper engineering principles, materials and construction techniques.

 
Search this Thread