Framing kneewall on bottom of U-shaped Stairs

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Old 10-10-11, 09:19 AM
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Framing kneewall on bottom of U-shaped Stairs

I'm not sure kneewall is the appropriate term here, and I may be reading way too much into this, but I'd like confirmation before moving on. I've framed around my U-shaped staircase and would like to leave the lower 1/2 of the stairs open on one side w/ a handrail. The stairs are a pre-fab housed staircase w/ the treads and risers notched into the skirt boards.

When I frame the wall that will be underneath the handrail, do I just frame as usual, with the top of the "top plate" level with the top of the skirt board? Should I fasten the skirt board to this section of wall or let it float?

This is a picture of what I plan to do, but I'll put a handrail on mine:
 
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Old 10-10-11, 04:30 PM
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In order to keep the "open" look, don't build a wall, but install a balustrade with a newel post firmly attached at the bottom and balusters spaced less than 4" all the way up capped with a handrail? Am I reading too much into this? I like the open design, too, but you have to figure in safety, obviously.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 05:21 PM
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That's exactly what he said he wanted to do. He is asking about framing around the stair.

I think that's about what I would do. I don't know how far along your framing is, but I think I would leave a gap large enough between the 2x4 wall and stringer to slip the drywall behind it. This will put the unfinished edge of the drywall out of sight and leave you enough space on top of the stringer if you decided to run a cove moulding on it. I wouldn't attach the stringer to the wall.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 05:36 AM
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OK, I see, this isn't a picture of the OP's staircase, only a wish list. I was wondering WHAT framing. It looked pretty good to me!!
Do as mentioned, leaving space for drywall. You did say the skirtboard is in place, right?
 
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Old 10-11-11, 01:14 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I framed out the angled section last night just as drooplug mentioned (leaving the gap for drywall).

Unfortunately, I squared the bottom plate of this wall with the back wall of the landing of the stairs. But apparently, the lower half of the stairs are not square to the landing. On my new wall, I now have a 1/2" gap at the top of the steps and a 1 1/8" gap at the bottom of the steps. I can slide this section of stairs slightly to reduce this difference, but I don't want to compromise the attachment of the steps to my landing by doing this. In addition, then I'd increase the gap on the other side of the steps (previously built by the house builder), which is at 1/2" the length of the lower steps.

Any ideas? I'm thinking my only option is creative trimwork.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 03:23 PM
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Why didn't you just run the wall parallel to the stairs?
 
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Old 10-11-11, 04:32 PM
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Agree, move the wall...............
 
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Old 10-13-11, 03:14 AM
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Or should you choose not to move the wall, why not shim the studs behind the drywall, transitioning out gradually to maintain the spacing required by the drywall? And also, don't forget to put some backing in behind the drywall at each tread level, or your drywall will take a beating over time and have some serious dings (or holes, even) in it from errant "clodhoppers."
 
 

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