Metal nailless bridging

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  #1  
Old 10-13-11, 09:46 AM
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Metal nailless bridging

Hi,
I am looking to cross bridge the floor joists in my basement to stiffen up the floors above. I have found this metal nailless bridging that looks promising but I'm not exactly sure how to install it? It says it can be installed before or after sub flooring/sheathing and that it takes one nail to install. Does anyone have any experience with this type of bridging? Which direction does it install? Or doesn't it matter? It looks like the nail would go in the end with the 3 pointy teeth? I am wondering how would to install so that it attaches to both joists? Thanks for any insights!

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Steel Grip Tooth Bridge (USP #MBG1016)

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  #2  
Old 10-13-11, 09:59 AM
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If it matters, Lowes says it's no longer available on your link.

That said, I'm having a hard time figuring out how this would help your floor system if it's not attached mechanically to multiple joists. What do you have currently for joists (size of the joists, distance between joists and length of unsupported span of the joists)?
 
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Old 10-13-11, 10:12 AM
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No it doesn't matter, I found them elsewhere at a good price. Just picked lowes because it had a clear picture. Joists are 2X10 16 o.c. with 12' unsupported span. Two of these metal bridges would make one cross bridge. I am thinking maybe the points on one side "dig in" to one of the joists and the 3 teeth on the other side "dig into" and are nailed into the other but I'm just not sure.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 10:44 AM
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I don't remember exactly...but the straight end gets tapped into place near the top so it bites, then the bent end is tapped up at the bottom of the adjacent joist so its a tight fit (entirely within the joist bay, not hanging below). Then the 3 prongs are banged into the joist and a nail put in to secure it.

I'm pretty sure thats the way they are installed.
 
  #5  
Old 10-13-11, 11:29 AM
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Bridging

Scroll down this page to see the diagram for installation:

http://www.uspconnectors.com/pdf-full-line-2010/182.pdf

I would question the effectiveness of this item. I have not used them. Just my thoughts from seeing the info provided.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 11:35 AM
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Oh, they work...I've seen plenty in use. Since they are right beside each other they prevent twisting quite well. Dunno how much actual support they might provide...prob none?

I think solid wood blocking is probably better, but a bit more time consuming and expensive.
 
  #7  
Old 10-13-11, 11:37 AM
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Thanks guys! Thanks for the link Wirepuller38. That is exactly what I was looking for. I am going to give these a try. I figure they can't hurt and hopefully I will notice a difference in the floors above.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 11:51 AM
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Oh, I think I get it now - this looks a lot like the crossed pieces of wood between the joists in my parents' house (built in '66).
 
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Old 10-13-11, 12:03 PM
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Ya, I painted for a builder 15 or so yrs ago that wouldn't use the metal ones. He made his boys cut and install wood bracing..... his houses didn't go up as fast but he did build them to last
 
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Old 10-13-11, 03:38 PM
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Forgive me and tell me if I am wrong but I thought cross bracing only prevented the joists from twisting and possibly pulling down and away from the floor. If it is bounce that you are trying to suppress then I do not see these helping anything. I would think a thicker floor screwed to the joist or a beam under the joist would be the only fix for a bouncy floor. I see the original poster says he want to stiffen up the floors but I am not sure what that means.
 
  #11  
Old 10-13-11, 04:18 PM
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I have read that cross bracing might help stiffen the above floor somewhat. I am doing this because I am about to drywall the ceiling in the basement and I figured if I do this I need to do it now. Since I can use this metal bridging it will be quick and easy. And I was able to obtain all the materials I need to complete the job for under $50. Whether it will actually firm up the floor remains to be seen but even if it doesn't then no big loss in $ or time and it certainly won't hurt having them there for the other purposes they serve.
 
  #12  
Old 10-14-11, 06:12 AM
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Bridging

Forgive me and tell me if I am wrong but I thought cross bracing only prevented the joists from twisting and possibly pulling down and away from the floor. If it is bounce that you are trying to suppress then I do not see these helping anything. I would think a thicker floor screwed to the joist or a beam under the joist would be the only fix for a bouncy floor. I see the original poster says he want to stiffen up the floors but I am not sure what that means.
The bridging is used in pairs to form an "x" between each floor joist. The result is that each joist gains support from the joists on either side of it.
 
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