Outdoor Detached Patio Ceiling Framing

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  #1  
Old 12-16-11, 12:55 PM
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Outdoor Detached Patio Ceiling Framing

I have a detached covered patio that was built by the previous owner. upon tearing down the 4X8 wood sheets that were used for a ceiling I discovered that they used 2X4 for ceiling joists. There is a double beam running dow the center of the structure and all other framing appears up to snuff. I am planning to put up a new ceiling (Tongue and Groove or some other wood ceiling sheets or planks), but I wanted to fix the framing structural issues first by adding support to the 2X4 ceiling joists. The structure is 18 ft X 16 ft.

I have been told that I can do one of the following:

1.remove the 2X4s and put in 2X6s.
2. add 2X6s in between the 2X4s and nail the new ceiling sheets or planks to the 2X6s only.
3. create two strongbacks (one on each side of the double center beam) using a 2X4 and a 2X6 in an L shape running perpendicular to the joists for further support.

Does anyone have any recommendations on how I should do this?
 
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Old 12-16-11, 07:00 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Would there be any way for you to post a few pictures of the patio in its present condition so we can see what you see?? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 12-17-11, 05:36 AM
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You say there is a structural problem but did not mention a problem like the ceiling is sagging. The reason I ask is depending on how your car port was designed and built 2x4's may be correct. Engineered trusses often use 2x4's in places you might not think.

If you see metal plates that have a lot of holes at the joints between the framing members, or if you see pieces of plywood nailed on the sides at the joints you may have engineered wood trusses. If the frame members but up to each other or if one piece is beside the other and you see nails holding things together than it was stick built and 2x4's are probably under sized.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 10:23 AM
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there was no sagging from the original 4X8 sheets of roofing wood that were used as ceiling material, but I wanted to make the structure look more appealling so i took down the old ceiling to discover that the ceiling joists were 2X4s. I will try and send pictures shortly.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 10:29 AM
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here is a link to pictures of the structure. Pictures by tcaesar1 - Photobucket

This is a covered patio area that is detached from the house.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 10:57 AM
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Why are you worried about that ceiling? Everything is nice and straight, no rot, no insect or water damage. It looks beautiful! I wish I saw more in great condition like that. What are you going to put up in place of the plywood? Tongue & groove bead board would look nice.

My only complaint/dislike are the wires in the first two pictures that appear to be underneath the joists.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 11:19 AM
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I'm with Dane - you need to move those cables but otherwise this looks great.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 02:11 PM
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thanks for the replies!

Those wires were old and have now been replaced by an electrican for fans and flood light for BBQ above the joists.

As for framing, i was told that the ceiling joists should not be 2X4 but 2X6 in size to properly support the ceiling material that I nail to these beams. I was either going to put up 4X8 sheets in plywood, hardie, or some other material and I just want it to hold properly and have no risk of sagging in the future.
 
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Old 12-22-11, 03:02 PM
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How old is the structure? If the 2x4's have done OK holding up the plywood ceiling to this point I would be hesitant to invest the money & labor to fix something that is not broken, though it would be relatively easy to sister 2x6's to the existing 2x4's since you have it all opened up. This certainly would be the time to do it. Are you a gambler?
 
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Old 12-23-11, 04:37 AM
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You could always use rafter ties from the rafters to the joists vertically to add support at their midpoint. That yellow pine isn't going anywhere. Nice job.
 
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Old 12-24-11, 08:04 AM
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Ceiling Joists

The structure is 18 ft X 16 ft.
If I understand your description, the span of the 2x4 ceiling joists is approximately 8 ft. Is this correct?

What is the spacing between the ceiling joists?

I would do as Chandler suggests and tie mid point of the joists to the rafters.
 
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Old 12-31-11, 08:47 AM
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there is a double 2X10 running down the center and then 9.5 ft runs of 2X4s from the double beam from there. There are 11 total beams running every 16 inches. I think that I have decided to put 2X6s on every other beam and put a strong back down the center of each side for added support. Now I have to decide whether to put up a hardy 4X8 sheet or pine T & G planks.
 
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