Beam Sizing for Basement Remodel

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  #1  
Old 12-21-11, 08:05 AM
J
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Beam Sizing for Basement Remodel

I am trying to plan out a basement remodel so that I can submit for a building permit. My current plan is to replace part of a load bearing wall with a beam, but I am unsure of what size and type of beam I should use.

This is the existing floor plan:



I want to change the floor plan to this:



The beam would be 15 ft clear span and rest upon a steel post at each end.

The beam is a floor beam for a single story residential home. Above the beam is a living room and a wall that runs perpendicular to the beam and parallel to the the joists.

If the beam is less than 12" deep, I could run it under the joists. However if it would be better or necessary, I could cut notches in the joists to insert the beam.

I am contemplating whether I should use a steel I-Beam or an LVL beam. Since this a remodel, the weight of the beam is a consideration. A steel beam would have to be light enough that a few strong men could carry it in and lift it in place.

If I use a steel I-Beam, what size should I use?

Also, can I use beam bracing to help strengthen the beam? If the joists were notched out and connected to the beam, would that help brace the beam?

Please don't tell me to hire an architect or a structural engineer!

Thanks for the help!
 

Last edited by jonathan99; 12-21-11 at 10:22 AM.
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  #2  
Old 12-21-11, 08:22 AM
S
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Welcome to the forums.

What's your objection to a structural engineer?
 
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Old 12-21-11, 08:29 AM
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Well, first, I am trying to learn and understand for myself, instead of just paying someone else to give me the answer.

Second, I find it hard to find and hire professionals, it seems easier to figure it out myself.

Third, while having an engineer to help would be great, it seems like this problem is common place enough that the answer would be straight forward.

Fourth, since I am trying to scope out the work here, I don't want to start paying professionals until I understand what is or isn't possible. Sort of an estimation.

Five, the county building permit guy told me that hiring an engineer was not a particularly great way to go. He suggested that I talk to full service lumber yards who can size the beam for me. I did find that Zeeland Lumber could size an LVL beam for me, but since they do not sell steel beams, could not size a steel beam for me.

With all that said, I am pretty open minded to all options.
 
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Old 12-21-11, 09:58 AM
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OK, I can live with that answer

I'm not qualified to answer your intial question, hang tight and the guys with knowledge in this area will be by shortly.
 
  #5  
Old 12-21-11, 01:42 PM
J
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I used this beam sizing tool: WebStructural with the following parameters:

Steel: A992
Shape: W8x28
Span: 15 Feet
Bracing: Equal Spacing 16in o.c.
Load: Uniform 1.0 Kips Dead

The design passed. I am wondering if I used the correct parameters, and if so if there is a lighter beam I could use. This beam would weigh about 360 lbs.
 
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