Replace T+G sub floor.

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-20-12, 05:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 47
Replace T+G sub floor.

Found some dry rot in my bathroom sub floor after tearing up the 1/2" particle board, in several sections of 1.5"x5" T+g, post and beam, with a crawl space.Looks like some of the sections go up to the outside wall. Any tips on replacing it? I am hoping to do it from the top side, since the crawl space is so tight.Almost tempted to just cover the t/g with 3/4" plywood, and cover that with vinyl. This started out as a remodel,with the thought of using tile.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-20-12, 06:08 PM
shecandoit's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 11
T & G Subfloor

When I pulled up my subfloor which ran under the wall, I set my circle saw at 3/4" + a little for good measure, used a carbide blade and ran around the perimeter. You'll want to keep your cutting lines nice and straight because it's easier to fit the new pieces in. After pulling it all up, you'll be left with about 2" all around where you couldn't get tight to the wall. I used that lip and screwed a nailer about 3" wide on under it with screws going through the lip from the top and down into the nailer, setting the nailer with about 1 1/2" under the lip and the rest into the opening to support the new subfloor. A little subfloor adhesive where the two contact each other is a good idea. You might want to clamp those nailers to the lip so that they get pulled up nice and snug as you screw them together for the new pieces to lay on and don't end up getting pushed down. I then cut and laid my 3/4"-4x8 T & G into place, also with subfloor adhesive on the nailers I had installed and the joists and then screwed that down. Naturally, you'll want to go ahead and scew the perimeter down securely through the nailers too so there's no flex at the seams. I really much prefer screws to nails. If you're tiling, you would need to install an appropriate tile backer over the 3/4". If you're putting down vinyl you should thoroughly check out what the recommended backer is for your particular product and whether it is glued at all or not, as many of the new ones aren't. Hope this makes sense! Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 01-20-12, 06:34 PM
shecandoit's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 11
P.S. on T & G Subfloor

I just caught that your T & G is 1 1/2" thick so you would have to set your skill saw to that depth not the 3/4" that I mentioned. I would then probably install the new subfloor with possibly two layers of 3/4" 4 x 8's perhaps layed perpindicular to each other. If you run both layers in the same direction, perhaps for greatest convenience, you will want to stagger your seams so that the top layer doesn't match the bottom layer and I also would again put some subfloor adhesive between the layers. The other thing you might want to do to save some money and time too, would be to cut strips of 3/4" material, plywood or 1" boards and build up the floor joists and nailers so that you only have to lay down one layer of 3/4" 4 x 8 T & G. Hope one of those ideas works for you. I'm kind of a "do a little more" than "a close my eyes to the situation" person and think you would do well to pull up your old floor. I think that you'll be happier with it in the end. Plus if you don't pull it up, you won't know the actual condition of your joists and that might be a problem later on. It could be a can of worms now, but at least you can do something about it. If I found that to be the case I would attempt to sister new joists right along side of the old ones.
 
  #4  
Old 01-21-12, 07:13 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 47
Thanks for the reply. That "nail to the lip" idea is something I will consider. What is "sub floor adhesive"? I never heard of it.Can you get it at a big box store?. Also my floor does not have floor joists.It has post and bean 4 foot on center, with the outside wall edge going right on the foundation, which in itself presents a very unique challenge.I also have a tight crawl space,under the floor, and so would like to do as much as possible from above.
 
  #5  
Old 01-21-12, 03:36 PM
shecandoit's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 11
Sub floor adhesive is almost as common as nails (or screws!) when doing subfloors. Yes, it is bought in caulking tubes pretty much at any store that has any kind of building materials. It greatly reduces or even eliminates any squeaking and adds substantial strenght. If you have a quart caulking gun the quart tubes are less expensive and less fooling around with changing the smaller tubes. I usually run a solid bead down each joist, which takes us back to your post and beam construction. Are your posts cemented in and still pretty vertical? How far apart are they?

You've not mentioned the size of your bathroom area. Small, large, somewhere in between?

Can you create a joist system by possibly removing (cutting out)beams to give a straigh shot across an area and/or hanging joists on joist hangers attached to the beams? I am lacking in any kind of mental picture as to exactly what you have to work with.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes