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Installing Washer/Dryer UPSTAIRS in Old House....Bad Idea?

Installing Washer/Dryer UPSTAIRS in Old House....Bad Idea?

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Old 02-27-12, 12:25 PM
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Installing Washer/Dryer UPSTAIRS in Old House....Bad Idea?

We live in a 115 year old 2-story colonial with balloon construction. Currently the washer and dryer are located spack dab in the middle of the kitchen. It had been my plans to eventually move the washer and dryer to a large closet upstairs next to the bathroom.

Well I was watching Holmes on Homes last night and he had commented on how its a bad idea to do that in older homes because the framing and subfloor will not be adequate and the whole house will vibrate when the washer is on the spin cycle.

Is this true? Where I was planning on installing the washer and dryer is on the outside wall where the floor joist meets the wall stud. I would be installing new flooring at the time and could make sure everything is glued and screwed just like it should.

Or am I going down a bad road and should find somewhere else for the washer and dryer? I'd hate to have it end up like an 18-wheeler is idling in my house. Watchya think?
 
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Old 02-27-12, 02:23 PM
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I have seen modern spec built houses with the laundry located up stairs and the dishes in the kitchen on the first floor would rattle so it can be an issue. I think much depends on how your house is constructed and what washer & dryer you have. Some houses creek and flex during high winds while others are rock solid. Also, I believe that the modern horizontal style washers don't shake the house as much as the older vertical drum models so that could be an option.

I don't think gluing and screwing the flooring under the washer will have any affect on it shaking the house.
 
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Old 02-27-12, 05:54 PM
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In addition, run from the artsy pedestals for the modern washer dryers. They are mostly semi braced sheet metal and will transfer the lightest vibration and multiply it considerably.
 
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Old 02-27-12, 06:52 PM
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I dont think spin cycle vibration is much of a issue with the new front loaders. Industrial supply houses like MC have all kinds of fixtures/gadgets that will reduce "machine to foundation" vibrations also....

Installing good drain pans and proper dryer venting are the largest headaches for second level laundry rooms. Nothing like a over flowing washer or busted water fill hoses to ruin ones day downstairs. jmo
 
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Old 02-28-12, 05:47 AM
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Thanks for the replies everyone! That brings me to my next question. Since I've never lived in a house that had proper drainage for a washer....what is "Normal"???

I've always assumed there should be some precautionary failsafes in the event of an overflow but for the life of me I can't picture it. Can someone elaborate on this? Even if the washer/dryer stay where they are in the kitchen this is something I should think about anyways.

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-28-12, 06:13 AM
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Basically you want your washing machine to live inside a shower or shallow bathtub so any leaks are caught and sent down the drain. The catch basins work especially well with the modern front loaders that do not use a large amount of water. Older machines with a vertical drum can overwhelm most basins if the bottom seal fails suddenly dumping 20 gallons on the floor but it still protects you against slower leaks.

There are also electronic sensors and valves that will offer some protection. The valves are installed on the hot and cold water lines to the washer and a sensor goes on the floor. When the sensor detects water it closes the valves. They do work but like any piece of technology it can fail and it can do nothing about catching the water that's already in the washer but it's a great system if a hose leaks while you are not at home (since most people never close the valves behind the washer when the machine is not in use).
 
 

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