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Advise needed for basement floor


TonyGnz's Avatar
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04-09-12, 10:16 AM   #1  
Advise needed for basement floor

I am in the process of finishing by basement and can use some good advice. So far the concrete walls have been framed out, and the drain lines for the bathroom have been cut in & floor patched up. My next step is framing and floors. This is were I've been going nuts trying to figure out the best and cost effective way to continue. Everyone has been giving me different opinions of which is best.

Level & install sub floor first, then frame walls.
Frame walls first then floor.
Install OSB board with plastic under it for sub floor.
Install dricore instead of OSB & plastic. OSB & plastic will only cause problems in the long run.
No need for a sub floor, install flooring directly on concrete.
Unless installing tiles a sub floor must be installed.



Can anyone with experience with give me some advise?

thanks

 
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stickshift's Avatar
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04-09-12, 01:00 PM   #2  
What do you plan to install for the floor?

Any moisture issues down there?

 
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04-09-12, 01:01 PM   #3  
Door #5. I am not a fan of wood on concrete, especially if there has been even a hint of moisture on the concrete in the past. You can install laminate flooring (of which I am not a fan either), or graduate to a nice 5/8" click lock engineered flooring with proper air venting underlayment as prescribed by the manufacturer of the flooring.
As you mentioned, tile is a good and "forever" flooring for concrete. Cutting and staining the concrete itself is another inviting method of floor finishing.
I'm not going to sway you with my answers, so let some of the others chime in with their preferences so you can make a better educated decision.

 
TonyGnz's Avatar
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04-09-12, 09:15 PM   #4  
I will be installing tiles in the bathroom & laundry room, interlocking rubber mats for the play room and probably engineered flooring for the living room and pantry room. I was going to go with the dricore until I found out it will run me $1300.00. Then someone mentioned OSB board which will run about $455.00. I was then advised, by another person, not to use the OSB, just go over the concrete with the tiles and glue the wood floor down. I don't feel comfortable with gluing wood to the concrete because of the possibility of moisture ruining the floor.

 
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04-10-12, 02:45 AM   #5  
I prefer the click lock installation over gluing. Gluing is so..........messy. Click lock will allow for expansion and contraction and will also allow for minor course corrections should the beginning not be perfect, since it floats. Remember too, your tile will be a one level. If you added any "board" prior to your flooring, you would have quite a threshold to deal with. At least with engineered flooring, the transition wouldn't be so dramatic.

 
TonyGnz's Avatar
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04-10-12, 08:04 AM   #6  
Remember too, your tile will be a one level. If you added any "board" prior to your flooring, you would have quite a threshold to deal with. At least with engineered flooring, the transition wouldn't be so dramatic.
I'm aware of the height differences. If I were to do a subfloor it would be for the entire basement. All my flooring including tiles would be set on the subfloor. I'm just not sure if it would be better to install the subfloor or just go directly over the concrete with my flooring, and also if I should stud the walls first then worry about the floor, or do the floor first then stud the walls.

 
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04-10-12, 09:18 AM   #7  
first thing to do is to run a moisture test. either borrow or buy a moisture meter, or tape a 2x2 ft piece of clear plastic on the floor, wait a few days, see if any water droplets form under the plastic.

 
TonyGnz's Avatar
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04-10-12, 06:30 PM   #8  
I just did that today, taped plastic to the floor. It's only been on a few hours. I'll see what I get tomorrow.

 
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