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Floor Joist Fix


Chacho's Avatar
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04-27-12, 03:19 PM   #1  
Floor Joist Fix

Pandora's box. Funny how that works. I was in process of replacing a garage heater, which will involve some plumbing. I thought I only want to deal with this plumbing once, so I should probably fix these floor joists. As you can see by the pictures, someone down the line thought it would be a good idea to put holes in the joist probably to run the plumbing through. You can see the fine craftsmanship. These joists are 2x10x14. The holes are approximately in the middle of the joists. The joist are supported by the foundation wall on one side and a steel I-beam in the middle of the house. The floor is maybe sagging by about 1/8" - 1/4". It is not that severe but I hate leaving things with problems. I'm looking for suggestions on a fix. The plumbing will obviously have to come down and I will have to clear out some HVAC and electrical to make this happen. Can I sister the joists to fix this? Do the sistered joists need to be the full 14' long, which will take some wedging to get the joists in place? Can I jack the joists one joist at a time or do all the affects joists need to be jacked at the same time? Any help would really be appreciated.








 
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Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
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04-27-12, 03:54 PM   #2  
Drilling through joists, and notching joists, is fine but there are rules of what can be done and where. Here is a quick breakdown: How Joists Work | The Family Handyman

That said, you do have some issues. I will let the pro carpenters chime in.


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04-28-12, 03:37 AM   #3  
The only problem I see is the notches on the bottom of the joists. You now have a 2x8 or 2x6 (depending on the depth of cut) at that point and beyond, which will cause a problem with a 14' span. Is the span broken by the metal beam? What is the total unsupported length of joist?

 
Chacho's Avatar
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04-28-12, 04:48 AM   #4  
The house has metal I-beam that runs through the middle going north/south, there are 14' joists that overlap in the middle of the house over the I-beam that span to the foundation walls on the east and west sides of the house. The problem area is roughly at the midpoint of the 14' joists on the west side of the house. These joists bridge the I-beam and the foundation wall, supported at the I-beam by about 5" and the foundation wall by about 3", making the total unsupported area 13'4".

 
Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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04-28-12, 06:00 AM   #5  
I have an older house where a couple of deeply notched joists were repaired by spanning the notches with 1/2" thick by 2' long steel fishplate through bolted on both sides of the joist. I believe the repair was done about 20 years ago when the plumbing was upgraded.
I don't know if this sort of repair is allowed by code but I am 100% confident in it's strength.

 
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