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Any issues with using Finger Joined studs for interior framing

Any issues with using Finger Joined studs for interior framing

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  #1  
Old 06-12-12, 02:16 PM
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Any issues with using Finger Joined studs for interior framing

For non-load bearing walls, has anyone come across any real issues about using finger joined studs for framing vs. standard wood studs?

At a rough count, the Utility room I am building would see a savings of roughly $48.30 by using finger joined studs vs standards wood studs.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 02:39 PM
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I've never even HEARD of finger jointed studs! Of course I never heard of that timberstrand stuff that Mike Holmes always uses either...until I saw a 2 y/o repeat of one of his shows.

If they are approved by your local AHJ...then I'm sure they are fine. Most likely ONLY for non-load bearing walls I would imagine?

In some ways...I'd guess they are better...less or no warping, twisting, or bowing?
 
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Old 06-12-12, 04:15 PM
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Finger joint studs are almost always straight! I don't remember if there ok for load bearing walls or not. There supposed to be just as strong as long as they are installed vertical and horizontal.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 05:27 AM
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marksr,
I think they are only ok if installed vertically. Horizontal use would put too much stress on the finger joints and lead to failure.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 05:38 AM
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oops, I left out a word

I meant to say as long as they are installed vertical and not horizontal.

 
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Old 06-13-12, 05:46 AM
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oops, I left out a word

I meant to say as long as they are installed vertical and not horizontal.
I figured that is what you meant. Just wanted to clarify in case someone else read that and took it at face value.

So really other then being restricted to only vertical use, I guess there are no other real issues with using them?
 
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Old 06-13-12, 05:56 AM
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The carpenters that I've worked around always liked the finger joint studs because they were never warped. Made their job easier because for the most part they didn't have to inspect them before they nailed them up.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 05:58 AM
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Good to know.
That and being ~45% cheaper then normal 2x4s.... Sounds like a good option.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 10:51 AM
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It's pretty common for a glued joint to be stronger than the wood around it and the finger joint makes for pretty significant surface area for glue. I can see it being possible this would even be stronger in the horizontal position but cannot back that up with data, only intuition
 
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Old 06-14-12, 12:33 PM
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My recent experience with glued finger-jointed material wasn't a good one. I had bought a total of four 16-ft., primed 5/4 stock from the local lumber store, draping and tying them over the cab of my pickup. As we were unloading them, one of the members actually broke into 2 pieces right at the finger joint. There didn't appear to be any glue in the joining surfaces, and the bouncy ride home was enough to cause separation. Elmer's glue saved the day.
 
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Old 06-14-12, 12:36 PM
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Yeah, a finger joint without glue is not going to be strong....
 
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Old 06-14-12, 03:37 PM
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Man...you guys have experience with some weird wood. FJ studs? FJ 5/4 stock? Never seen it or even heard of it. I'll I've ever seen is FJ trim and door frames.

What the heck is the 5/4 used for?
 
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Old 06-14-12, 05:05 PM
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I am in the same boat as you GG. The only FG stuff I have seen is in the millwork dept. Maybe because we have lots of trees? Oh wait, I'm pretty sure Canada has a few trees too.
 
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Old 06-14-12, 05:20 PM
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I think there are a lot of different types of wood that are region specific.

Not sure why Finger Joint wood would be region specific though. Maybe the folks in certain areas figured out how to use the short scraps of wood for something other then lighting the wood stove.

I do remember them using FJ studs on a Canadian show we have up here called Canada's worst Handy man. It's kind of more entertainment then educational, but that is where I first discovered that stuff. Also noted that they stated it was only good for vertical loads.
 
 

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