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Buying new construction, 2nd floor subfloor not level, sick to my stomach

Buying new construction, 2nd floor subfloor not level, sick to my stomach

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  #1  
Old 06-28-12, 06:01 AM
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Buying new construction, 2nd floor subfloor not level, sick to my stomach

I'm buying a brand new house and the subfloor in an upstairs bonus room/bathroom is not level. Hard to tell the reason without looking underneath (joist problem?) but the contractor is in the process of pouring leveling compound on top of the ceramic tile in the bathroom and re-tiling on top of that. Is this a problem?!

Also, the dip in the floor extend to the bonus room itself, which is carpeted. Leveling compound is being applied here as well, mostly to build it up to the level of the bathroom tile.

I wanted the contractor to pull the subfloor up and have a look. I was originally told that the subfloor was warped and it would be replaced, but when I visited the jobsite I found the leveling compound in use.

Really sick to my stomach because it's a brand new house we're scheduled to move into within a few days.

Thoughts?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-28-12, 06:44 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Red flags here, IMO. Too late to walk away?
 
  #3  
Old 06-28-12, 07:14 AM
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Not good building practices. If these are the problems now....you can guess what they will be a bit further down the line. If the framers didn't correct it...that's a problem. If the tile guy didn't see it and say something...that makes his work suspect.

If necessary, I'd get your lender and insurer involved.

A few days delay for them to fix it now is better than problems down the road.
 
  #4  
Old 06-28-12, 09:08 AM
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Not too late to walk away...but you know how it goes. Lots of time and energy went into finding the house, working the deal...and we've got a potential renter lined up for the home we're currently in.

It should be said that this is a spec and I am forced to deal with the investor instead of the contractor directly. The contractor does pretty good work in my region (NW Arkansas) but who knows as far as the subs are concerned. I ran into the guy doing the leveling compound, and he did not strike me as a flooring expert. Nor did the guy doing the tile this morning. Handymen, perhaps. Flooring specialists, definitely not.

I'm going take another go at the investor to see if he can make things right. I guess ultimately I have the right to back out before we close. Therein lies any leverage I may possess at this point.
 
  #5  
Old 06-28-12, 09:18 AM
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I worked in a new spec house one time and the problem was the result of the basement floor. All the exterior walls were fine, but when the basement floor has a dip in it, all the walls that are built on top of it will have that dip too. It was really noticeable when they were putting the trusses on and they were sitting on the exterior walls but floating way above some of the interior walls.

It's like the central footing was 1 1/2" lower than it should have been or something. I just assumed it was poor concrete placement.
 
  #6  
Old 06-28-12, 05:41 PM
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Bandaid on heart surgery The GC isn't fixing the problem, just covering it up so you will go away. IMO, it won't get better.
 
  #7  
Old 06-29-12, 06:36 PM
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I've never heard of "an investor" being the person in charge of any residential construction project. Is that something unique to Arkansas? You are a bigger gambler than most of us should you choose to move in and hope to live happily ever after.

Do yourself a big favor, and let the renter you have lined up move into the new place (paying you what you've put down, and making the payments), while you stay put where you are while searching for something else built by a decent contractor.
 
  #8  
Old 07-11-12, 07:51 AM
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a quick question for the op. how did you discover that your floor was not level? did you take the measurement or did one of the contractors notified you?

as others said, don't discard your gut feeling and accept it as-is.

at minimum, discuss your options with your attorney and correspond in writing only with all involved parties.
 
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