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Repairing a Cut Joist


timaelabu's Avatar
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VA

08-21-12, 08:37 PM   #1  
Repairing a Cut Joist

I was redoing my kitchen the right way by getting plumbing&electrical permits. In the process i had to remove the builder installed (20yrs old town home) fire-place and it exposed the fireplace exhaust that was installed by cutting a floor joist.

Please see the document with pictures and notes - AND a 2 min video

Questions: -

- Can a header be installed only on one side of the cut joist ?
(see the diagram"B" in document link)

- Less important question - will this impact my home insurance till it is fixed (ok'ed by the county)?


Last edited by timaelabu; 08-21-12 at 09:03 PM. Reason: diagramsin the .doc format were deformed converted to PDF file
 
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chandler's Avatar
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08-22-12, 03:29 AM   #2  
Ahh, fireplace installers have been added to my list, along with plumbers who have no regard to framing. The right side is OK, since it sits on a vertical wall. The left side needs a "bridge" to help support that flapping end. You may (since I can't see from the pix) have to cut back even a little more on the I-joist in order to install a 2x12 (or whatever size fits) on the end of it and have space to work. I would extend the 2x12 over the wall, attach it to the end of the I-joist and bridge to the adjacent joist, fastening it there with a T notch so the 2x12 not only fits the top and bottom chord, but sits inside to fit the webbing, where you can screw it in solidly and it will rest on the bottom chord.
Forgive my rudimentary drawing.

Attachment 2799

 
BridgeMan45's Avatar
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08-22-12, 03:32 PM   #3  
I'd also be concerned with the monster hole cut through the I-joist web for the HVAC duct--not good. The fact that this set-up has been in service for 20 years tells me that the joist is possibly a bit redundant, and/or not being fully loaded.

Make sure to use only well-seasoned 2x stock for stiffening the I-joist web as chandler suggested. I've heard horror stories about moist dimensional lumber shrinking when used for same, and causing significant damage to the I-joist.

 
timaelabu's Avatar
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08-23-12, 06:24 PM   #4  
chandler - Thanks for the design.
BridgeMan45 - Thanks for the tip.
I was looking at the http://www.internationalbeams.com/fi...ign-Manual.pdf and it makes sense what chandler has suggested. I will take all the measurements and get a well seasoned lumber for web stiffening. It is a redundant joist and because there is another joist that less than 16inches on the side of the duct.

In your experience does the county inspector ask for official document from a Structural Engineer (certified P.E.) before passing this fix suggested here ?

for the web stiffener install i will have the open the wall and roof on the side of the duct(kitchen side) and i will take some more pictures and draw and ortho diagram for your comments.

 
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08-23-12, 06:46 PM   #5  
More often than not (on the structural engineer sign-off document), but it depends on the AHJ. A few I've dealt with over the years come close to demanding the permit holder's pencil sharpener be certified by a testing agency, while others could care less about anything structural.

 
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