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Why is the floor creating water on itself?


Melissa2012B's Avatar
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10-29-12, 10:42 PM   #1  
Why is the floor creating water on itself?

This is the weirdest thing. We got this house in the Denver area in 2005. It's a 2300 sq ft UBC modular ranch that was put on a foundation with a crawl space. It was built with plenty of vents on each end, and placed on the foundation with the insulation still up under it, covered with plastic sheeting.

But ever since it was built, water has formed on the floor in areas of the front living room that adjoins the front door. We thought it might be being caused by the AC. We had the AC run through the heating vents, which run under the house and come up in the perimeter walls into floor level ducts. So we kinda figured that the cold air from the ducts running under there was condensing water on the floor. But it was ONLY doing it in that one room.

So over the summer, we found a energy audit company and had them do an IR camera around the house. They found all kinds of leaks and eventually managed to seal things up much better, which has been saving us money. But one thing they also suggested was to seal all the crawl space vents and seal the plastic at the bottom of the crawl space, to the concrete around the perimeter, and that would create an insulated crawl space without allowing radon to come up past the plastic.

The whole thing ( along with sealing the main floor better ) was done for $400 which we could barely afford, but figured it would save us energy fast, and it seems to have. Now if it goes between 35 and 65 degrees each day, we don't need any heating inside, it's nice.

But as part of this, they took a look at the water formation on the floor and said that some of the air ducts in that room were loose and leaking AC under the floor, which was probably causing the condensation of the water. So they sealed them, which fixed one side of the room, only the condensation on one side of the room kept happening.

Then the cooling season ended and the heating season started, or at least very little heating has been needed so far, but no AC for about the last 6 weeks. BUT the one side of the room is still forming water on the floor.

This is driving us crazy. The floor is tiled in the whole house with vinyl flooring, so we can see the water pooling in this one area, and it's NOT being caused by the AC now. So what in the WORLD is causing it???

 
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10-30-12, 02:43 AM   #2  
Is there any way to detect the relative humidity of the house? Why did they seal off the ducting to the room? Or did they seal the leaks around the ducting? Not clear from your post. Have you replaced your return filters on the HVAC system regularly? If the air is not flowing back through the system, it can have an effect on humidity and heat/cooling. While you are at it, make sure you only have one filter in the system. I have seen quite inaccessible filters abandoned for more accessible ones, say in a wall cavity, and the original abandoned, but left in place, just to sit there and collect dust over the years and cause problems with the system.

 
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10-30-12, 10:22 AM   #3  
No, they found that the ducts weren't connected right and leaking, so they sealed the leaks around them, and on one, they had to push the duct together before sealing it, it was that bad.

Yeah, we replace the filters just fine and there's only one. We had the AC system installed to use the heating ducts and instead of the cheap flossy filters, we had them put in a 18x25" x 4" pleated, which really helps keep the dust down.

But that doesn't explain why water is condensing in just that one room, with no AC being used.
And the bottom of the crawl space is sealed now, it's warmer down there than it used to be in cool weather.

 
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10-30-12, 03:41 PM   #4  
Is the unit properly draining to the outside? That much water tells me that a emergency pan drain may be plugged. Is there a plastic pipe that constantly drips, actively dripping outside?

 
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10-30-12, 03:54 PM   #5  
What unit? The furnace and AC cabinet is 80 feet away from the front living room, AND we haven't used the AC in 6-8 weeks, as I explained.

 
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10-30-12, 04:14 PM   #6  
So this leak has nothing to do with rainfall? Anytime you have ductwork in an exterior wall, it is there at the expense of insulation. So the ductwork in the exterior wall is cold metal, the inside of the house has warm air. Leaking outside air probably is contributing to the problem. If all the above is true, this problem probably can't be fixed without eliminating the wall registers, insulating that space, repairing the drywall, and turning them into floor registers like they should have been in the first place.

 
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10-30-12, 06:03 PM   #7  
Gosh I'm confused. The registers are at the bottom of the outer walls. Wall or floor registers?
I dunno.

 
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10-30-12, 07:39 PM   #8  
Pretty simple. Are the registers mounted on the wall or are they mounted on the floor.

 
Melissa2012B's Avatar
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10-30-12, 07:44 PM   #9  
At the very bottom of the walls.

 
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10-31-12, 04:00 PM   #10  
Does your dog or cat have a name? Maybe it's time to try house-breaking him/her.

 
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