converting a garage

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  #1  
Old 11-24-12, 04:29 PM
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converting a garage

We are turning our garage into a living space for my mother. How do we attach the plywood sub-floor to the sleepers? Also, how much space, if any, do we leave for expansion, both around the perimeter and between the sheets themselves?
 
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Old 11-24-12, 04:41 PM
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Welcome to the forums! For a potentially squeak free subflooring I would use 3/4" Advantech subflooring which is T&G, and attach it with 2" torx decking screws to your 16" oc sleepers. Leave 1/4" around the perimeter for movement. What do you plan for a finished floor? Do you have a vapor barrier under your sleepers?
 
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Old 11-24-12, 05:03 PM
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Yes, we have put down 6mil plastic. As for the finished floor, since Mom uses a walker and wheel chair, we'll probably have to use some sort of very low pile carpet. Wed prefer hardwood to match the rest of our 1955 home, but shethinks wood is cold and noisy. Maybe wecould put hardwood down, and then cover with carpet.
 
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Old 11-25-12, 03:51 AM
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You could do the carpet over the hardwood, but you would eventually have to deal with the kazillion staples in the padding. I'd just go with the carpet for now and later convert to hardwood. My mom used a wheelchair for a while and aside from her insisting I put in 3'0" interior doors when I built her house, she wanted hardwood. Now, this was many, many years before she ever needed the wheelchair, but she had the foresight to know she would be living there a long time. Good move on the wide doors, and the wheelchair moved smoother over the hardwood than it would on carpet. But that's a choice to consider. Today's hardwoods are super hard and can stand up to rubber wheels pretty good.
 
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Old 11-25-12, 10:35 PM
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Thanks for your input, chandler. Since Mom is currently residing in an assisted living facility, I've been taking notes (and measurements)so were trying to put a lot of thought into this. We just dont always know the best way to go about it. Im sure well have more questions and its good to know theres someone willing to help
 
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Old 11-26-12, 03:45 AM
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Just tack your questions on this thread and we'll be here. Good luck with the reno.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 04:39 PM
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Plumbing question

Re our garage conversion: there was a small bathroom in the garage that connected to a septic tank. Several years ago we connected to the public sewer and had a line run to that bathroom. There was no venting for that bathroom. We are putting in a larger bathroom and have a question about the plumbing. Where the sewer enters up through the cement, do we need to add a stack to run the shower, sink, and toilet vents to or will tying the venting for those three fixtures together and running a vent up through the roof suffice? The sewer line enters on the opposite wall from where the fixtures will be located.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 06:23 PM
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I'm no plumber, but I suspect a vent run directly to the roof near the fixtures would be preferable. Maybe a few plumbers will chime in shortly.

I see you are in Illinois--cold country in the winter. Have you figured out a way to keep Mom's new room warm? I've personally seen several garage conversions that were always very cold (and uncomfortable) in the colder months of the year. A conversion in Colorado I inspected a few years ago (in February) was extremely cold, even though a ceiling-mounted gas furnace was running full-blast. For starters, I'd suggest insulating the concrete floor between the sleepers with an appropriate foam material, and fully insulate the walls and ceiling as well. You did level the sleepers, yes, to compensate for the garage floor's slope? Then you might consider baseboard electric heating units on several exterior walls, controlled with a wall thermostat. Mom will love you for it.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 07:22 PM
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You should build the vent stack to supply air and exhaust to the fixture drains. Sloping and/or combining those drains to flow into the existing sewer pipe is a different piece of the puzzle.

I upgraded the controls for the heat in a converted garage that is now a rental a year or so ago. The heat was electric baseboard units. The place stayed cozy but the operating cost was high and the tenant had to be careful to keep several stretches of wall clear.

I would suggest, if you're still in the planning stage for the floor, that you investigate ways to incorporate radiant heat under the hardwood that you guys really want. Under the tile in the bathroom, too, for that matter. It definitely won't be a cold floor, and it will be fully usable and accessible.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 09:44 PM
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Thanks for the input on the venting systems. My preference would be to skip the stack since that will require breaking up the cement, but we also want it done right.
As for the heating/cooling, that is a very good question. I'd love to go with the radiant floor heat, but the better half is looking into a v tach unit, which I detest. We've investigated a mini-split system, but that may be too expensive.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 08:54 PM
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There are some experienced plumbers here who may come by and give you a more definitive answer on the venting of your drains. In the meantime, I'm curious - what is "a v tach unit"? Will that facilitate getting the wood floor you said you would both prefer?
 
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Old 01-08-13, 09:14 PM
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Several years ago we connected to the public sewer and had a line run to that bathroom. There was no venting for that bathroom. We are putting in a larger bathroom and have a question about the plumbing. Where the sewer enters up through the cement, do we need to add a stack to run the shower, sink, and toilet vents to or will tying the venting for those three fixtures together and running a vent up through the roof suffice?
This garage sewer is tied into the main house sewer? Can you take pics of whats there? Nothing in the garage was ever vented? Studor vent maybe?

Please takes pics. It will help to give better advice,,,,

 
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Old 01-09-13, 10:20 AM
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Sorry, the heating/cooling unit is a PTAC. I'll take some pics and post them.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 04:56 PM
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You can install that if you want to. I'm not a fan of the noise and condensation some of them produce, but they do provide cooling as well as heating, since they're heat pumps. That also means that you'll be creating the back-up heat with electricity, which is very expensive to do, unless you have gas and can find a unit that uses that.
 
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