Can this non bearing post be removed?

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Old 02-05-13, 01:13 PM
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Can this non bearing post be removed?

I am exposing the post and beams in the upstairs and I came across this post. Its 4x4 and i believe it was put in to give the plaster guys something to nail the lath on too. Can it be removed? Im worried it may have the sheathing attached to it on the outside. I have no real way to determine if it is or not. It is the beam in the middle. It looks like it is supporting the brace but the brace is in prefect shape so it should need any support.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:27 PM
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Looks like a thick 2x4 to me. No I would not remove it, why would you want to?
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:47 PM
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Best to leave it IMO. I am not a carpenter but it looks like its support for the brace which in turn is attached to the top plate.

Is it in your way or something? I agree with X... why remove it?
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:48 PM
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Im exposing the post and beams and in conventional post and beam that is not there. I think it was just added to they had something to nail the lath too. It isn't plumb, its rough cut, and it sticks out 2 inches past the brace. It looks out of place. I assume if its not needed then get it out. It will create a better insulated envelope with out it as well.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:52 PM
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It is not supporting the brace. The brace is motris and tenon'ed to the main post and top beam. the joints are in excellent condition. It was added after the framing was done. It is made from rough cut pine. The original post and beams are chestnut.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 01:54 PM
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Yes it would seem its for the lath but why the brace? Why did they not just go right to the top plate? Is this an up stairs?

I would think it may be for the roof structure support......


I could be wrong.. wait for the carpenters to chime in.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 02:21 PM
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The brace is there to support the post and top beam. It helps keep everything perpendicular. This is upstairs. The diagonal brace has to stay. That part is structural. The vertical post below the diagonal brace is what I would like to remove. Its worth noting that the house frame is 1830. So this is traditional post and beam not stick or balloon framing.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 09:39 PM
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I would try to remove it. You've determined that it's not structural. Sliding a thin blade, such as a flexible putty knife, behind it, will tell you whether the sheathing is attached to it. If it is, a couple of careful cuts through the 4x4, stopping just short of the sheathing should give you some manageable sections to pry loose.

There should be just a couple of nails at each end to remove to get it free.

I'm curious - how are you planning to finish the walls, once you have removed the later add-ons?
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:26 AM
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I'll admit that it doesn't look load bearing, but also need to note that I do not see any jack posts supporting a header over that window. So, IMO it probably IS load bearing in that it is preventing movement in and around the window. Removing is may put additional strain on the window opening.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 06:16 AM
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The post isn't supporting anything around the window. The window has 6x6 posts on either side of it that go from beam to beam. There is a 1/4 air gap between the brace and the post. So it has zero load on it.

I plan to put 4 inches of Poly Iso with drywall glued to one side. I will cut it to fit and crazy foam it in place. Then I plan to use joint compound to finish the edges between the drywall and the wood.

I am considering using J bead to finish the edges but i think it won't look as clean.

Here's a pic of a quick mock up of what it will look like. I plan to do the entire room this way including the ceiling.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:26 PM
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That will look really nice - and authentic to the period of the house. You can finish the drywall to be virtually indistinguishable from plaster by skimming the entire surface and then wiping it with a damp sponge just as it's starting to set up.
 
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Old 02-11-13, 06:24 AM
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well I removed the post and opened up more cavity. I got 3 inches of polyiso in the cavity and next the sheet rock will go over the top of that. The post came right out. There was no load on it at all. Ill get a pic of the polyiso in place tonight. Probably wont be drywalling until wednesday or friday.
 
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Old 02-12-13, 02:55 PM
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I would skim-coat the drywall to appear to be plaster. If I got a little on the framing, oh well. The plasterers back in the day did too.
 
 

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