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2X4 wall in unfinished basement


diy409's Avatar
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03-25-13, 07:29 PM   #1  
2X4 wall in unfinished basement

i framed a 2x4 wall about 16' long in an unfinished basement. the basement can be prone to dampness at times. in hind-site i should have used pressure treated 2x4 for the floor plate.

whats the best available waterproofing sealing product that i can use to protect the wood floor plate from dampness over time, of if it should ever be exposed to water from a leak?

thanks

 
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03-26-13, 03:28 AM   #2  
16' ain't squat. Cut the nails from the studs on the bottom plate and remove it, replacing it with a PT board. No amount of waterproofing will make the standard grade lumber anything but a crumbled mess in a few years. Anyway, how would you get the stuff under it, where it needs it most. R&R.

 
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03-26-13, 05:12 AM   #3  
how would you get the stuff under it, where it needs it most
That's it in a nutshell!!! ..... and it's relatively easy to replace the bottom plate at this point, unlike a few [or even 10] years down the road when the wall is finish and inclosed.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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03-26-13, 06:29 AM   #4  
In addition to replacing the plate with PT, I would run a few beads of construction adhesive under the plate before shooting it down. The wood will sit on a thin layer of adhesive making it less likely to wick moisture up into the wall.

 
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03-26-13, 09:54 PM   #5  
yes ..
thanks, i know it the right answer, just hate redoing things
as an old timer once told me "you wont make that mistake again"

 
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03-27-13, 02:39 AM   #6  
"Do it right the first time, or do it over, when you have less time and money to do so"

 
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03-27-13, 03:33 AM   #7  
We've all learned by making mistakes along the way


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03-27-13, 07:53 AM   #8  
I would also start looking outside to get rid of the water problem - it becomes a bigger deal the more finishing work you do in the basement.

 
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03-27-13, 04:43 PM   #9  
Use a capillary break between the wet earth/slab/plate, even if p.t. Many people think p.t. is treated against water, no, unless specifically ordered that way, or higher grade rating (than the box stores). Water will wick right through it; Pressure-Treated Sill Plates and the Building Code | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com
Use some 1"PIC ( for a thermal break as well as the capillary break) to stop your walls from being "heat sinks" warming the slab and earth below. Otherwise, it will just wick to the kiln dry studs, as said already.

Gary

 
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