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float an existing basement wall


mjd2k's Avatar
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03-27-13, 03:26 AM   #1  
float an existing basement wall

Hi,

About 5 years ago I moved into a new house. I hired someone to frame the interior walls. When he was done, he had only floated it about 1 inch. I have since finished the basement. I did not like it but was rushed and he told me it was OK.

However, we are getting some shifting and I'm seeing the float disappear. Is there a way to refloat the walls without tearing out the whole basement?

I'm thinking I can
- cut out about 2 feet of drywall,
- cut off the bottoms of the studs to achieve a new gap,
- then toenail a new plate on the bottom of the studs
- install a new floor plate 2 inches below my toenailed plate.

I know its a lot of work but I want to get the float right.

My biggest question is, is it ok to toenail the bottom plate? I would need to toenail as I can't get underneath to nail up.

 
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03-27-13, 12:26 PM   #2  
My biggest question is, is it ok to toenail the bottom plate? I would need to toenail as I can't get underneath to nail up.
Sure. Aren't the studs toenailed to the existing bottom plate?

PT lumber for the one that's in contact with the floor, as you probably know.

 
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03-28-13, 05:55 PM   #3  
Thank you for the reply.

No the studs are not toenailed in. When the wall is floated, you can build the wall on the floor first as there is room to stand the wall up. Then you can nail from the bottom of the plate.

I really can't see any reason that wont' work. It would be a problem if it was floated from the top but its floated from the bottom

 
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03-28-13, 07:12 PM   #4  
Got it. You can use screws - decking screws or anything but brittle drywall screws - if you want to be a little more certain that it'll hold together.

 
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01-04-15, 10:04 AM   #5  
Forgot about this thread. Interesting I had a couple rental houses flood. Turned out floating an existing wall was an easy job.

One pic is actually from a bathroom with all drywall removed and new plate and gap installed (old house with no float previously). It was easier to do this than rebuild.

The other pic is from other walls already finished. I cut out 33 inches of drywall and put in 4' x 32" drywall panels with only screws in the corners. Then covered the screws with trim. This way I can easily take them off and also did not need to mud/tape. Saved me a week per house. Plus it looked really good.

I'm going to do the same in my house.......one of these days.

Just in case someone else comes across a similiar situation.

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Floating Basement Floor | Home Design Styles This thread Refback 10-02-17 12:53 PM