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Manufactured home subfloor to joists


Usedmavin's Avatar
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05-04-13, 07:27 PM   #1  
Manufactured home subfloor to joists

I'm renovating a 30 year old double-wide.
I replaced some of the 2x6 floor joists around the perimeter, but only up to the first I-beam, setting them between the I-beam and the original floor.

I'm having difficulty where the seams of the original particle boards meet over the joists. The original floors have a double particle board over those joists. That is the 2 particle boards come together over the joist with a 2" wide piece of particle board under those seams along the joist.

My question is whether these joists where the double thickness of particle board meet has been shaved down? When I lay a piece of plywood over the joist I'm having trouble with the double thickness of particle board. The problem may be because I've replaced so many of these 2x6's around the perimeter. Looking for some direction and explanation of how this was originally built so I can decide how to handle the project.
Thanks,
Usedmavin

 
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05-04-13, 08:26 PM   #2  
I'd rip out all the particleboard. It is just not a good flooring material.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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05-04-13, 09:29 PM   #3  
Is it particleboard or OSB? Some pictures will help us see what you have there.

 
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05-05-13, 04:52 AM   #4  
Got a picture?
Partical board subfloors will swell up with just a humity change, get it wet once and it turns to oat meal.
A single layer of Advantec T & G 3/4" subflooring and constrution adhesive on top of the joist is what I would use.
BY using a Toe Kick saw you can cut the flooring right up to the outside walls.

 
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05-05-13, 05:06 AM   #5  
Whatever I do, I need to understand the original construction on this 1978 Bucaneer Double Wide. Once again the main issue here is this construction of using a 2nd narrow width of particle board under the place where the particle boards seam on top of the 2x6.
Usedmavin

 
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05-05-13, 05:23 AM   #6  
Welcome to the forums!

Pics would be nice - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by double particle board. Almost every MH I've worked on has had a PB floor [if original] I have seen a time or two where there was a layer of PB over certain joists to give a wider margin for the staples that hold down the PB. I can't remember if this was just every 8' or if the sub floor was staggered and the extra strip of PB was every 4'


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Usedmavin's Avatar
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05-05-13, 07:24 AM   #7  
Thanks Mark,
What I've seen is that every so many feet, I assume it's 4, but maybe it's 8; there's a seam where the 2 particle boards come together. Underneath that seam is a 2" wide piece of particle board. I don't know whether they recess one of the 2x6's under that to accommodate the extra 5/8".

I'm running into a problem patching the floor because this creates a "hump" where I lay plywood. Perhaps you are correct in that this provides for a place to staple in. When I try to pry this piece up, it's like it's glued into the joist.

However, maybe I cause the problem when I cut into the 2x6's. As I mentioned I replaced a number of 2x6's (termite damage) around the perimeter. When I did this I had to really force them in under the existing flooring between the I-beam and the floor.

U.

 
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05-05-13, 02:13 PM   #8  
MHs a put together assembly line style so they have all the right sized parts waiting on them. Many are not the same as what we'd use when building a conventional house. When replacing any of the floor joists the main thing is to make sure the tops are all on the same plane. It's not uncommon to have to make minor adjustments to the size of the replacement framing.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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