Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

framing a room within a room


memichael's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4
TN

06-12-13, 07:22 AM   #1  
framing a room within a room

i am creating a smaller room inside of a loft in an old building and am wondering what would be the easiest way to frame the two new walls. i'm going to use two existing walls and build out to create a 14' x 10' room. The ceiling height (subfloor to the bottom of the joist) in the loft is about 10' 7" and varies when measured at different points where i'm laying out the spot for the new walls. the are some other obstacles such as pipe and conduit near the ceiling to consider.

so i'm kicking around a couple of ideas and would like to hear someone's opinion on one unconventional idea. what if i were to frame walls with 8' studs, stand them up in place, anchor to the floor and then cut to length pieces of 2x4 to attach the top plate to the ceiling joists with some L brackets and straps? my thinking is this will be easier than buying a bunch of 12' studs and cutting each one to length to account for the variance in floor to ceiling height and building it all in place. will the sheathing or whatever material i use to cover the walls help to hold this all together securely? the new walls won't be bearing any weight, just partitioning off my newly created room.

if this question is a little too vague i will try to elaborate a bit more. thanks for the help.

 
Sponsored Links
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 32,370
TX

06-12-13, 08:05 AM   #2  
I wouldn't bother with brackets and I'd use 10 foot 2X4s as studs.

I'd nail a 2X4 stud plate to the bottom of the joists. I'd use 10 foot studs. I'd put cripples between the top of the wall stud plate and the stud plate nailed to the bottom of the joist.*

Or assuming open joists, no ceiling, skip the 2X4 plate on the joists and nail the cripples to the sides of the joists. Easier, maybe sturdier.

*If you went with the first solution with a 2X4 plate nailed to the joists you would only need cripples in a few places to help secure the top of the wall. Given the small space between the top of 10 foot studs and the 2X4 on the bottom of the joists the cripples aren't needed to support the Sheetrock. Cripples you did put in could be secured by running a long lag screw through the wall top plate and the cripple into the joist plate.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
memichael's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4
TN

06-12-13, 08:27 AM   #3  
i appreciate your response, but let me add that i also have quite a few 8' studs on hand, which is another reason i was wanting to build 8' walls. i can and will go buy 10 footers if it's beneficial to do so. what if i used cripples atop my 8' wall nailed into the sides of the joists? is that allowed, or practical?

 
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 32,370
TX

06-12-13, 08:39 AM   #4  
what if i used cripples atop my 8' wall nailed into the sides of the joists?
That would work just as well. I only suggested 10's because that was the closest height.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
memichael's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4
TN

06-12-13, 08:47 AM   #5  
ok great. i just needed someone to confirm that would create a sturdy wall. made sense to me, but i'm no expert. thanks!

 
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 32,370
TX

06-12-13, 08:57 AM   #6  
Nice thing about nailing the cripples to the side of the joists is they don't have to be exact length. If the variance is only a couple of inches just set a stop on you miter saw for the shortest and cut all assembly line style.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
Search this Thread