Changing Entry; Do I need two headers?

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Old 07-18-13, 03:25 PM
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Question Changing Entry; Do I need two headers?

I hope I'm posting this in the correct section, if not, I apologize.

I'm remodeling and I'm changing the entry from a single door to a double door. I'm also pushing the entry out two feet from the original wall. I have already put in a new header to cover the span over the new entry doors, but do I need to include a second glulam beam to span across the original entry?

Here are some pics.


This is the new entry. You can see the new beam in place over the new jamb for the double doors.


I'm wondering if I need to replace the old header joist with a glulam to support the span?


Here's another shot, looking up from the floor, of the new entry header beam and the old header joist, which is tied into the old joists and the new short joists.
 
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Old 07-18-13, 06:39 PM
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It doesn't look like it's needed. The cross piece is already acting like a header. However, it can't hurt. You would have to bring in the wall a little, though.
 
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Old 07-18-13, 07:43 PM
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I'm not sure I understand your comment, "bring in the wall a little"? I figure, if I had to, I would remove the old header joist and widen the space between the old and new joists to accommodate the width of a new glulam that would span the width of the entry and rest on top of the double top plate on either side wall. Each side wall is already supported by a double or triple stud.
 
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Old 07-18-13, 08:32 PM
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I think the correct answer is a definite YES! Sorry, was I just shouting? LOL

If I understand what you have done correctly, you've basically removed a load bearing exterior wall (and old door header) directly below the point that used to be the edge of your ceiling, where your ceiling joists head off into the rim joist. It also looks as if there might be a JOINT in the rim joist where it changes color (by the expanding foam), which would be a HUGE no-no. You might as well cut that rim entirely out and insert something large enough for the loads involved. To do that, those ceiling joists will need temporary support so that they can be cut back, a header inserted, then the old floor joists must be placed in hangers against that beam. (the new ones don't appear to need hangers as they are less than 4' to their load bearing point, which is the new header. But an inspector may want to see them there anyway to resist deflection.) The beam you will have to add needs solid support underneath it all the way to the foundation... no voids. That includes not just your double or triple stud that you can see in the photo, but it must also be doubled/tripled as needed in the space under the floor clear to the foundation.

In picture 2 & 3, it's unclear if the new header has king studs on both ends. Also can't see if the header has the correct nailing pattern.

See: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/fr...-header.html#b
 
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Old 07-18-13, 09:03 PM
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XSleeper, this is definitely the answer I was looking for. I suspected I needed the glulam to support the load. I've got the beam and the hangers ready to go. I will definitely set temp walls for support before removing the old header joist.

No worries on the support. The triple studs on either side go straight down to the sill plate which rests on top of the double floor joists which are anchored into the foundation. This is true for both side walls. There is definitely solid support all the way to the foundation.

The new header does have king studs on either side. hard to see because of the 2x6 side walls. The header is actually a solid 4x10 with additional width added on the outside.
 
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Old 07-19-13, 04:25 AM
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There is definitely solid support all the way to the foundation.
All the talk of the tripled studs on the sides may have clouded the fact that it's not just the ends of the header that need the support (the king studs), its also the trimmer locations that need the solid support to the foundation. If the trimmer locations have moved away from the original locations (as in moving the original door header), it is pretty common that you have to add additional blocking in the floor to transfer those new load points to the foundation.
 
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