FRAMIING nail size for interior wall?

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Old 07-29-13, 11:16 PM
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FRAMIING nail size for interior wall?

Hello.

I was wondering what is the code for interior walls when using specific nails? Just bought me a Rigid 21* round framing gun, but I only need a handful of nails. Home Depot sells, 3.25" nails 1000 set, but is 3.25" okay? I live in Long Beach, CA. I will be building a pocket closet, and the wall will be perpendicular to one existing wall. The wall will be 7'L x 8' H. Will I be penalized by the city or inspector for doing this?
 
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Old 07-30-13, 04:04 AM
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Basically, framing is framing. I don't see why an inspector would have a problem with your using nails 1/4" longer than normal. The one thing you want to avoid is nail points driven through two side by side pieces of wood. With 3" wood (two 1 1/2" studs for instance) your nail would penetrate completely unless nailed on a bias. While not a code issue, those tips can snag wiring, rub up against plumbing, snag insulation, etc., so just be on the safe side and ask the inspector.
 
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Old 08-01-13, 05:57 PM
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Well, the ceiling joist, and top and bottom plate 2x4 will give enough clearance for the 3 1/4" nail. I just don't want to crack the existing joist and/or studs. What is the guidelines to how far apart each nail should be driven from each other when connecting it to existing studs/joist?? One trick I learned in Construction class was to lightly blunt the tip of the nail and soak it in water so it does not crack the wood. I may try this method with the nail gun nails.
 
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Old 08-01-13, 06:07 PM
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If you're using a nail gun the nail moves too fast to be an issue with cracking unless you are using completely dry lumber. Construction classes take it for granted that you don't use power tools. Don't alter the nails in anyway. If you nail an inch or so high on your stud, with the gun pointed downward, your chance of splitting the wood is reduced. You don't need to over nail things.
 
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Old 08-01-13, 10:25 PM
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The lumber I purchased is dry from HD, and I'm assuming the ceiling joist and wall studs existing in the house has been dry for a long time, LOL. What do you mean nail an inch or so high on my stud and point gun downward, it will not split the wood...if I'm putting a header parallel to the ceiling joist and will be pointing the gun upward. My main concern is the existing studs and ceiling joist. The header I will nail onto the ceiling joist with a gun will be plum on one side since it's parallel and I need to make an 1/2" gap to make a hole so I can push in one electrical conduit towards the attic.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 03:39 AM
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You will have the need to toenail certain members, sometimes studs. When toenailing you will angle the nail into the side of the stud and nail it down or up into the top/bottom plate. Headers are manufactured units that span across doors and window openings to help transfer the weight of the joists above them to the adjacent studs. Is this what you meant? It is at that point you lost me. Headers are not nailed to ceiling joists. Anything laying on its side cannot be plumb. It is level. What is is parallel to? Where does this 1/2" gap come into play, and why can't you just notch out the member where the conduit is and install a no-nail plate?
 
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Old 08-02-13, 05:36 PM
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The wall top plate will be parallel to the ceiling joist and I will have to flush one side so I can drill 1/2" hole (gap) diagonally to a section so I can run wire conduit to it w/o hitting the ceiling joist. This hole that will be drilled diagonally will be 6" from the end of the wall top plate. I am doing new wiring since I need to install a light switch and outlet receptacles to the new wall for the closet. The outlets will be on outer part away from clothes and light switch as well. Only way to do the light is to have it run to the top plate of the wall, but the joist is flushed to it that is why the top plate will be flushed with ceiling joist so it gives me enough space to make that hole to run wire conduit for the switch to the light receptacle. Only thing is, I found out that the existing joist and studs may not be leveled and I will have to put 2x4s blocking just in case I need it to secure the new wall.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 06:09 PM
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If you are running a wall parallel to the joists, it is always best to install cross members between the joists to catch the wall. That way all you have to do is nail vertically into the members. Seldom does the wall fall directly under a joist. In that case, drilling a hole in both members from below is not a problem, as long as you protect your wiring, especially if you are drilling at an angle.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 12:27 AM
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I just installed additional joist between the ceiling joist just in case I may need extra support to catch the wall I am building. One thing, I did not double top plate. I only had one top plate that will be nailed to the ceiling joist and floor. Is this okay? I've seen various videos and some had double top plates while some had just one. [shrug] Anyways, I just mounted the wall up with a single top plate and will nail it to the ceiling joist and floor tomorrow.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 03:24 AM
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You are in a non load bearing situation so a single plate will be fine. You will need to monitor where the top plate pieces end, so they don't end in mid air between studs.
 
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