Best Type Of Drywall & Wood To Use In Basement?

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Old 10-29-13, 09:48 PM
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Question Best Type Of Drywall & Wood To Use In Basement?

Hi,

I'm finishing my basement; the basement has a sub-pump but isn't in a flood zone and I haven't experienced any floods either but just to be pro-active is there any type of drywall and wood 2x4s I should be using in the basement?

For example, is there drywall / wood 2x4s that prevent mold if there was a flood?

Thank you!
 
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Old 10-29-13, 10:12 PM
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Use treated wood for your sill plates, standard 2x4's for the walls and mold resistant drywall. There isn't much that is really mold "proof".
 
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Old 10-30-13, 07:22 AM
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Also make sure the drywall is about 1/2" up off the slab.
 
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Old 10-30-13, 07:59 AM
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Question

Thanks for the replies!

Should I also use treated 2x4s for the wall too, or just for the sill plates?

Thank you!
 
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Old 10-30-13, 10:09 AM
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Just the sill plates. PT is not for indoor use except where the wood sits on concrete.
 
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Old 10-30-13, 05:07 PM
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Treated 2x4's would also twist and bow something terrible as they dry out.
 
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Old 10-30-13, 07:48 PM
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I have seen mold resistant lumber on TV but have not seen it in the stores, yet,

You could put down a double green sill plate for nailing your trim to and then use steel studs. Steel is more expensive, and will rust, but will not mold. Working with steel opens up a bunch of other things to think of so I suggest follow the others advice.
 
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Old 10-31-13, 02:58 PM
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Economical

To use mold resistant drywall throughout the basement would be costly and not help if there was a flood. Standard procedures in the basement have been described with using PT bottom plate, std. pine/spruce material for the rest. The less PT inside the home the better. If it needs to be fastened with galvanized nails (which is the recommended fastener for PT material) then what would it do to drywall screws and worse your health?

Drywall installed on any wall should be raised from the floor 3/4". This not only leaves a gap so the moisture isn't sucked up from the ground, but it allows an extra 1/2" of space for installing expandable flooring (ex. laminate) which is very popular in a basement and requires 3/8" for expansion and contraction allowing you to use any style of baseboard you desire.

Your basement walls should also have a 1" gap from the concrete foundation walls for an air space. Walls should not be tight as slabs are separate from the footings and typical slabs are "floating" this gap will allow the above structure to be remain as is. Adding a basement wall underneath existing structure adds no strength without the proper footings, with proper soil, and generally an engineers approval.

Don't waste your money buying "moisture resistant drywall". If your basements that moist you have way bigger issues and if it floods the modified paper on the same gypsum product will end up going in the garbage just like the regular board. In my opinion of course.
 
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Old 10-31-13, 05:55 PM
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Use 1/2" of foam board under a standard sill plate (and meet code- check locally) as pt will wick moisture; Pressure-Treated Sill Plates and the Building Code | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Add a bead of caulking between concrete slab/plate for an air seal due to irregular surfaces. The fb will act as a capillary/thermal/air break from the cold earth/slab and help protect the foam board on the concrete wall from room air; BSD-103: Understanding Basements — Building Science Information

No gap; fire-stop every 10' horizontally and at top- per code; Chapter 6 - Wall Construction

The fb raises the dew-point of the condensation so no wet fg insulation/framing. NJ is Zone M4 or 5; 2009 IECC Climate Zone Map - New Jersey

Use foam board thickness (to control condensation) plus fibrous cavity insulation (to meet code) for your Zone; IRC FAQ: Insulating Sheathing Vapor Retarder Requirements — Building Science Information

Fb the rims with canned foam to stop air infiltration/exfiltration; BSI-023: Wood Is Good . . . But Strange — Building Science Information

http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...l_seal_rev.pdf

Gary
PS- install drywall horiz. with 2' rip above/below the 4' wide center one (if 8-' tall and flood worries); Info-401: Air Barriers
 
 

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