Removing wall in Trussed roof ranch

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Old 12-05-13, 05:49 PM
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Post Removing wall in Trussed roof ranch

Hey guys, hope everyone is doing well tonight.

Got a question. My wife and I purchased a home this past summer and are looking to remove the wall that separates the living room and the kitchen.

The home is a 24' x 48' modular ranch built in 1992 with a full basement, roof is a trussed one.

My father who used to build homes before retiring says with a trussed roof, there are no load bearing walls, and I am free to knock the wall down with no headers in the attic.

It's not that I doubt my old man, but after searching the internet, some people say you should hire a structural engineer before doing this. This is our first home, and I don't want to just knock it down, and have the roof collapse on us. That would be bad...Mmkay? :NO NO NO: LOL

What does everyone here say?
 

Last edited by Gannicus; 12-05-13 at 07:02 PM.
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Old 12-05-13, 06:46 PM
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Quite a dilemma--take your father's advice, but risk having ceiling collapse problems. His thinking on trusses not needing interior support in the form of load-bearing walls is usually true. Emphasis on the usually. Because you don't know if the home manufacturer specifically designed the trusses to have interior bearing supports, enabling them to save a few $$$ on every truss they build (or purchase) by being able to use slightly smaller components. If the home manufacturer is still in business, you can contact their technical support people and ask them if it's safe to remove the wall, after you've climbed up in the attic to pull the stamped data information off of one of the trusses.

P.S. I hope you meant 24' x 48', and not inches.
 
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Old 12-05-13, 07:00 PM
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BridgeMan45,

Yeah, feet...not inches. LOL Totally messed that one up.

What if there are no stamps on the trusses?
 
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Old 12-05-13, 07:43 PM
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Without a manufacturer's identification stamp, you need to shop around for an engineer to analyze them for you. Before going that route, it would be worthwhile to contact the modular manufacturer to see if their trusses as a general rule are designed to be free-spanning.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 03:24 PM
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hey guys


Gannicus im doing the same thing planning on removing a wall between the kitchen and living room. Same Ranch house with trussed roof. I was wondering what you ended up doing. Im pretty familiar with structure, however the top plate of the wall was doubled up so i checked the situation in the attic. The joist on top of the wall was laid flat on its side. Does anyone know why that is?
 
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Old 01-04-14, 03:48 PM
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Does anyone know why that is?
I'm guessing its probably because its not a joist, it's just a nailer for drywall.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 03:59 PM
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So i realized that this is very hard to explain in words haha. My mistake. So i took some pictures to better explain. The first is the joist laid flat (marked by a blue arrow) in between two joists. The one laid flat is directly attached to the top plate in Photo 2. If anyone could tell me if its load bearing. Or why it was done that way it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks guys.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 04:06 PM
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the top plate in photo 2 runs along the flat joist. just to clarify
 
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Old 01-04-14, 04:41 PM
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In the top picture, the wall that you see running left to right is load bearing, since the ceiling joists all break (overlap) on it.

why it was done that way
Why the joist was laid flat?

If you are saying there is a wall under the flat 2x6, like I said, the flat 2x6 gives the drywall something to nail to on both sides of the wall. The wall is 3 1/2" wide, the 2x6 is 5 1/2" wide. That leaves 1" on each side for drywall to nail to.

From the little bit of the wall we can see in the picture (all 32" of it) (under the flat 2x6 that runs from top to bottom in your top photo) it does not appear to be load bearing at all. But if you remove the wall you will need to replace that flat 2x6 with something that is oriented correctly, like the others to its left and right.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 04:57 PM
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Thanks for the reply. the wall does run directly under the 2x6. sorry about the picture of the wall was trying to show the top plate. the wall has a doorway that has a 2x8 header, which is usually for a load bearing wall. but im assuming it is this was because of the orientation of the 2x6. so i will position the 2x6 to the same way the others are. Thanks!!
 
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Old 01-04-14, 05:06 PM
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If there is anything unusual in the darkness at the top of your first photo, like a joist that crosses the wall (anything perpendicular on top of that wall) it could change everything. I can't say the entire wall is not load bearing based on a photo that only shows the first few feet.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 05:14 PM
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On top of the flat 2x6 there is nothing. it runs to the outside wall of the house like the other joists. And ties in with the rafters (like the other joists). the floor joist under that wall is also doubled up. Ive included another picture of the wall with the doorway. the wall is 13ft.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 05:31 PM
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spoke too soon. i went back to check the flat 2x6. it is clear and has nothing perpendicular to it. however at the end the roof rafter sits on top of the end of the 2x6. does that make it load bearing or is it just sitting on the end of the 2x6.
Photo 1 shows the end of the rafter sitting on the end of the 2x6. which sits on the outside wall. Photo 2 shows the middle of the 2x6 with nothing running perpendicular to it. Would a 2x4 on its edge tied into the 2x6 ,running on top of the 2x6. also tie the 2x4 into the rafter be enough?
 
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Old 01-04-14, 06:15 PM
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If you leave the 2x6 in place, sister another 2x6 along side the opposite side of the rafter. If you decide to remove it, you will just need to leave the portion of 2x6 that is underneath the rafter by cutting it off flush with the exterior wall top plate.

No, a 2x4 would not be sufficient. Even a 2x6 is undersized if the span is 13', but it matches existing, so...
 
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Old 01-04-14, 07:25 PM
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Thanks for all your help Xsleeper
 
 

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