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Framing and finishing around basement egress window

Framing and finishing around basement egress window

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Old 01-09-14, 01:32 PM
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Framing and finishing around basement egress window

I have a basement egress window that is built into the concrete foundation and framed around with wood. There is about a 3" gap between the outer edge of this wood and the outer edge of the XPS foam I put on the concrete wall of the room (see here).

To frame around the window, should my trimmer be even with the edge of the foam, or even with the inside edge of the wood around the window (A or B here)?

I assume it is A. If so, how should I finish the area between the window and the drywall. With just trim (it would need to be 10" wide) or with part drywall in from the framing and part trim out from the window?
 
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Old 01-09-14, 01:58 PM
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Your missing some framing.
There needs to be 2 X 4's sitting even with the ones on the sides of the window and two more sitting horizontal to have something to attach your jamb extensions and trim to.
Then add one at the top and bottom in the middle to act as cripples.
basement wall framing around window - Bing Images
 
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Old 01-09-14, 03:08 PM
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Just bring your studs flush with the inside edge of the window frame, top, bottom and sides. There will be a gap, but your jamb extension (1x8 or whatever) will cover it all. Cut your sheetrock flush to the studs.

Are you using wood return or sheetrock return. Almost forgot.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 05:48 PM
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joecaption, I have not completed the framing around the window, pending an answer to this question. But when you say "2 X 4's sitting even with the ones on the sides of the window" that seems to be what I am looking for. Thanks.
 

Last edited by bilbeaux; 01-09-14 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 01-09-14, 05:51 PM
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Just make a. "Tunnel" so to speak of your wall framing and existing window framing. Don't worry about the gap.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 06:34 PM
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Thanks, chandler. I am leaning towards drywall returns. Do I need both a jamb extension and a return here? From what I can tell, they would occupy the same space.

Just bring your studs flush with the inside edge of the window frame, top, bottom and sides. There will be a gap, but your jamb extension (1x8 or whatever) will cover it all. Cut your sheetrock flush to the studs.

Are you using wood return or sheetrock return. Almost forgot.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 09:12 PM
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Yes, align all your framing with the rough opening of the window- with left edge of "A", or a "tunnel" like Larry called it. If you are using drywall returns, you don't need a wood jamb extension. You can drywall right up to the window. However that joint (where drywall meets window) will always crack and will need to be caulked.

What I would recommend first off, is that you add plywood to the rough opening- where needed- so that once the drywall is on, everything looks symmetrical with the window. So if you have a 1/4" gap on the sides and bottom of the window and a 3/4" gap on top, add 1/2" plywood on top before you hang the drywall. Shim as needed if things aren't plumb or level before you hang the drywall- the window will look crooked if you don't. After the drywall is finished, run a bead of caulk to seal the drywall to the window, then put a piece of wood trim (like base shoe) around the perimeter (into the wet caulk) to cover the caulking. Then a fine bead of painters caulk along both edges of the trim. *very nice*.



If you wanted to trim it with wood, it would be the exact same thing, just substitute wood for drywall. But you'd probably build the "box" out of wood first, then slide it into the opening, rather than installing it piece by piece. A sheet of nice oak or birch plywood ripped to the correct width would do the trick, if you put edge banding on the forward facing edges. Then apply your casing to trim the perimeter in front.

Drywall is probably less expensive, but IMO, more work what with all the mudding and sanding.
 
 

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