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Botched Joice


High Plains's Avatar
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AZ

02-12-14, 07:38 AM   #1  
Botched Joice

How do I fix this?

Would a 6 ft. sister joist with the following do the job?


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XSleeper's Avatar
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02-12-14, 10:30 AM   #2  
How far is it to the wall, measuring left from that notch? And what is the measurement from the bottom of the pipe to the bottom of the joist?

 
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02-12-14, 06:48 PM   #3  
27 inches from notch to bearing wall. 2 inches from bottom of pipe to bottom of joist.

 
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02-12-14, 07:56 PM   #4  
I think in this case, that joist is a lost cause, thanks to the plumber who cut it. What I would suggest is that you first completely remove the ceiling in that area.

Cut the joist off a couple inches to the right of that elbow (top picture), making a plumb cut. Remove the scrap of wood that is left remaining to the right of the elbow. Then head off that joist that you cut to the two adjacent joists with a perpendicular joist that will be about 22 1/2" long between them (assuming your joists are 16" on center). Run a bead of PL400 on the top edge of the joist so that the subfloor will be glued to it. You will use a joist hanger on each end of that 22 1/2" long piece, and then you will use a joist hanger to attach the joist that you plumb cut on the back side of the header.

Next, add a new joist onto each side of the sewer pipes (left and right sides, bottom picture). These new joists will carry the floor load that the notched joist is no longer able to carry. They should be long enough to sit on the bearing wall that you said is 27" away... and on the other end they will be held with joist hangers where they meet the front side of the 22 1/2" long header. Run a bead of PL400 on the top edge of the joist so that the subfloor will be glued to the new joists.

The notched joist does not need to be removed... with all the subfloor nails in it, it's probably better off if you just leave it as is, as it isn't hurting anything by being there. If you wanted to try and reinforce it with something 2" wide, then support that double thickness with another joist hanger (3" wide), you could try, but IMO that's a waste of time.

Speaking of subfloor, it looks like the left side of the diagonal subfloor (bottom picture) is totally unsupported. If that's a bottom plate to the far upper lefthand corner of the picture, you might want to glue and screw an additional 1x4 (1x2 or similar) to the bottom of that bottom plate so that it butts up flush to the diagonal subfloor.... and then glue and screw ANOTHER cleat over the seam between the 1x2 or 1x4 and the diagonal subfloor, so that it is not left totally unsupported. Kind of screwy, but some plumber really hosed you on that one. 'Course, he would blame the framer.

 
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02-15-14, 02:54 AM   #5  
Thanks

Thanks for the help. You have a keen eye. Happy Trails, Dave

 
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