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Install an LVL on Gable end of two story house with balloon construction.

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  #1  
Old 02-23-14, 02:01 PM
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Install an LVL on Gable end of two story house with balloon construction.

As the title implies, I need to find out how to install a 14" double LVL between my house and an addition. The house was built in 1900 with balloon construction, and has upstairs joist running parallel to the gable end. The ceiling height in the main house is 9.5 ft, and the room addition ceiling is 7.5 ft. The engineer stated that I need two 14" LVLs to span the 16 foot opening. If the joists were perpendicular to the gable it would be a piece of cake to just add a temp support wall; yet it is not.

Since the room addition has a lower ceiling, there is room above the opening in the main house side to lag bolt a temp header, but I do not know if that is how it is really done. Would the load point have to be transferred to the basement floor for the temporary jack studs?

There are many posts to adding LVL Headers, but this situation is as unique as all the other posts.

Respectfully submitted

Michael007
 
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  #2  
Old 02-23-14, 02:41 PM
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Yes, the load path of the new header would need to be transferred all the way to the foundation... and it's possible that a temporary wall would need to be built on multiple levels too.

Since the joists on the older existing side are parallel you have next to nothing to support on that side, only the dead load above the header location. On the addition side, well, you didn't say anything about which way the joists run on that side. So that is what we don't know and why we can't answer specifically.

Generally you will lag a temporary ledger across/above the opening before cutting and removing the wall studs below. If a temporary wall is needing to be built on the addition side, it can usually temporarily pick up the weight until the header is built. Maybe with just a few temporary posts on the main floor and in the basement below. But with a lack of information about the direction of the ceiling joists and floor joists, it's hard to give any specific advice. We'd need floor plans and diagrams of each floor to give an intelligent reply.
 
  #3  
Old 02-24-14, 09:11 PM
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I had never thought of supporting the wall from the addition side. It sounds like the next step is to explore the ceiling of the addition and find the joist orientation. This would also give opportunity to investigate the insulation situation.

Thank you XSleeper.
 
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