Rotted Header and Temporary Support

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Old 04-28-14, 09:27 PM
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Rotted Header and Temporary Support

Hello, this is my first post here, I have found so much helpful information here that I figured I might be able to get some feedback with my situation and maybe in the future I could offer someone else help even though I am new to home DIY. I recently discovered I have a rotted header above my patio door. When we bought our house some of the siding above this window on the second story was replaced and the belly board between the two sheets right above this door. Shortly after the exterior trim above this door warped and was replaced, the caulk was totally shot allowing water to sit on top of the door frame.

So now I have ordered a set of french doors and am thinking about what I will need to do to replace the rotten header, trimmer and king stud. I will have help from someone more experienced but I want to do my best to have everything figured out as soon as possible. This is in a two story house, the floor joists above are perpendicular to this wall and the roof is parallel, the foundation is a concrete slab. I have pulled off some of the drywall and found that the top plate above the 4x12 header has a bow, it seems like the header wasn't framed tightly to the top plate and overtime it sagged until it contacted the header. At the edges near the king studs there is a 1/8-1/4" gap and no gap at the center.

My first question is should I try and jack the header up with a screw or bottle jack and take out some of the sag? I talked to a few people about this and one person told me he never had much luck trying to remove the sag like this one. Also if I need to I will replace the trimmer that isn't rotted, right side in the pictures, because it wasn't framed tightly to the header (it was shimmed and still had a gap).

My second question is about the temporary support, I have a good idea of what needs to be done and was thinking I would frame a temporary stud wall to handle the load. But now I am wondering if it will be easier to use screw jacks with a beam on top and bottom instead? This seems like it might be easier to assemble and would help with trying to take some of the sag out of the top plate. If I do go this route should I pull the drywall from the ceiling to get more solid contact with the floor joists and eliminate any possible crushing. I'm also wondering if the jacks should be extended just enough to move the joists, something like 1/16" or should they just be snugged up to the joists?

Thanks for any help and sorry for the long post but any info I can glean from the people hear will be really helpful.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 03:24 AM
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Welcome to the forums. Bottle jacks are good for temporary work, but tend to leak down quite a bit. The stud wall method is the safest and easiest to install. You do not want to put undue pressure on the ceiling above, just keep it from sagging.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 07:37 AM
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Thanks for the response, I was wondering about renting screw jacks for the temporary support. Are they any easier to install than a stud wall? And leak down wouldn't be an issue with the screw jacks. This will be my first time framing anything and even though I will have help it initially seemed that the screw jack route was simpler. Also what kind of spacing typically would be used for a stud wall if the joists are at 24"

For the bottle jack I was wondering if I would be able to take some of the sag out of the top plate by jacking the header into place then installing the trimmers?
 
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Old 04-29-14, 07:48 AM
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Renting is $$. You still have to support the overhead joists completely, so just renting two jacks won't suffice. Studs are cheap. Install a base 2x4 and a head 2x4, driving studs in to keep things from moving at 16" oc. I cut my studs about 1/4 to 3/8" longer so they will be tight.

Yes you can use bottle jack or car jack to help lift the header and put pressure on the top plate. Install tour jack studs at the same time.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 07:59 AM
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Not sure how it works there but around here that was framed wrong in the first place.
That 2 X 4 over the door should have been sitting on top of the jack studs, not beside them.
Also with a 2 story house we would have used double jack studs not just a single.
If that was mine I would remove some more sheetrock on the sides and reframe for doubled up jack studs, get rid of that old header and 2 X 4 and just make up a wider longer header.
Got a picture of the outside in that area?
Was there a piece of Z moulding over the top of the door trim to direct water away from the wall?
 
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Old 04-29-14, 09:56 AM
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Thanks for the good replies!

Since the 2x4 is only there for framing the door I didn't think it was a problem that it was between the jack studs. Since I'm going with a french door and it requires a slightly larger rough opening than the slider I will be taking that 2x4 out anyways.

The tables in the IRC do show that there should be two jack and king studs on each side. When I called the city they said if I am removing and replacing i don't need to add. If I have the space I will add them but the wall to the left of the door is very short and leads to a breakfast nook/bay window in the kitchen. And the wall has one inside and one outside outlet, an outdoor light and a light switch. So space is limited.

The question on the trim is a good one, I'm still struggling with how to detail the siding and trim. All of my windows now have t1-11 up to the frame with rough 2x4 trim over the top so only the caulking between the 2x4 and siding is there to keep water out. I haven't found any good details for t1-11 online but for hardie vertical siding they say to cut the siding at the top of the trim and install z flashings behind the siding and over the trim. Since this is a fully exposed wall I think that would be the best way to flash the door. I will also add a WRB under any siding that comes out since there is currently nothing under the siding.

Once I'm at a computer I can post some pics I have of the exterior which has a whole different set of problems.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 04:46 PM
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From the outside, I still have to figure out what to do about he AC lines if I replace that sheet of siding.
 
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Old 04-30-14, 04:39 AM
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IMO it isn't a big deal to disconnect the electrical and reconnect it after the new siding is installed but the freon line is a big deal. Unless you wanted to pay a HVAC tech to disconnect it [and come back later to reinstall] it would be better to cut a slot in the new siding and slip it down around it and then figure out how to fill the void below.
 
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Old 04-30-14, 08:33 AM
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Yeah I have no problem working on the electrical but was thinking the enterance into he siding was so close to the bottom of the sheet that I might be able to cut a slit in the sheet up to the hole and get it over the lines if the sheet is flexible enough. If not I'm sure I can find a way to flash and caulk a patch there and if I really hate it I can have someone come out to disconnect the lines and I will redo that sheet.
 
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