Framing a raised floor

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  #1  
Old 11-08-14, 07:49 PM
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Framing a raised floor

Framing our garage floor to match the the rest of the house levels to use it as a room. Currently the highest part of the garage is 13 inches below the house level. If I use a rim joist of a 2x10 around the perimeter of the garage (20x14) and cross joists every 16" along the 14 foot side will the floor hold up being elevated up? My other options are to use 2x12s but I don't want the wood to touch the concrete floor since then I have to worry about using treated wood and even vapor barrier which some carpenters I have asked have given me different opinions on.

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Old 11-09-14, 05:36 AM
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You still need to use a vapor barrier under it all. Remember the framing and subflooring will be subject to moisture from below, and you want to prevent that. I would shim the middle of the span on top of the vapor barrier to prevent the inevitable bounce that could be associated with the longer span.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 09:00 AM
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So you mean like put a 2x4 "sleeper" towards the middle so it doesn't sag later? Since I'm putting the vapor barrier you suggested would this shim/sleeper have to be pressure treated?

And sorry 3 more questions:

1. Can i put some of the regular pink fiberglass insulation in between the floor joists?
2. Can I run the hard aluminum dryer vent in between the joists to the outside wall or will the heat that passes through the cause issues under the floor?
3. The garage has these 6x12 wire vents on the walls close to the floor, should close these or will this help the new raised floor ?
 
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Old 11-09-14, 09:11 AM
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If you choose to use a sleeper, then, yes, it should be pressure treated. Just wasn't sure how close you planned on setting your 2x10's to the floor.

1. You can, but I would opt for Roxul instead of fiberglas. More insulative qualities per inch, flame resistant, waterproof, and mold proof.

2. Yes, use solid, not corrugated piping as your vent. It won't produce that much heat. You can encapsulate it in the Roxul without problems.

3. If the vents fall to below where your flooring will go, close them up. They will not add to any ventilation for the entire floor, just the joist bay where they lie.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 09:31 AM
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Sweet thanks alot, you just made my project easier
 
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