Engineered Girder

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  #1  
Old 11-14-14, 10:18 AM
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Engineered Girder

Where does one go to find information (spans / sizes) for engineered girders?
These would be ledger trusses, Glue lam, LVL and PSL beams.

What I need to know is the APPROXIMATE size for a 24' unsupported girder (only supported at the ends) that will support a floor. The floor is 16' x 16' supported at one end by a ledger attached to a bearing Wall the other end is supported by this girder. The floor uses standard 2x12 joists.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 02:20 PM
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This is a job for a real structural engineer, not something to be guessed at.
There is no "approximate" size on this one.
I give up, what's a "ledger truss"?
I'm sure if you go on enough websites you'll find someone that's never been on site, never looked at what it is your trying to build and has no clue that will tell you what they or there cousin did but what goods that going to do you?
Plans should have been drawn up and approved by the building dept. and a permit issued with inspections when done.
 
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Old 11-14-14, 02:54 PM
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Any time an engineer or inspector sees "ledger" a lot of lights go on and they need more information since some loads require through bolting instead of a quick and dirty insert of some sort.

The rest of the remaining 24' length (8') might also be carrying some unknown loads.

A lot of unknowns without more information and floor plan showing other areas.

Any reputable supplier can give you the information and may be offer a signature unless it is in a seismic area.

Have you checked to see what the permit people will require?

Dick
 
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Old 11-15-14, 11:35 AM
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More info

Some background. I am an engineer and have my own engineering business just not a structural engineer. I am caught between a rock and a hard place. The permit process has been going on for over 2 years now with one denied permit. I can only find one PE in the area who is capable of doing the work but is too busy to do the drawings. His comment, do the drawings and he will approve them. The building Dept will not give ANY info of ANY kind without an application in place. Even with one in place they were not willing to commit answers to direct questions. They want me to play a guessing game at my expense. At the time the first permit was denied I was into the "architect" for about 8K and I later found he still had to sub out the structural. So the budget is very tight now so I am going direct to the engineer.

The term "ledger truss" was given by my engineer for nothing more than an engineered girder built like a truss. (ie triangular cross bracing). I guess he used the term ledger because rather than putting the floor joists on top of the girder we want to attach them to the side. (the reason has to do with floor height and clear space under the floor)

Current tables i have are for solid wood beams. I am tempted to punt an use a steel beam (easy to calculate) if I can not find data for engineered beams. I am not asking for you to design my beam just where to go to find the info.
 
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Old 11-15-14, 02:04 PM
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The floor is 16' x 16' supported at one end by a ledger attached to a bearing Wall the other end is supported by this girder. The floor uses standard 2x12 joists.
I'm a novice, and this may sound simplistic. I do have experience submitting plans to city.

I would be more concerned with making drawings rather than the calculations. The city is going to require details of joist attachment to girder and ledger. They also need details of ledger to bearing wall. Details of footings, Floor Plans of loads above girder and bearing wall where ledger is attached, etc. It's quite a job.

Figuring span of 2 x 12's across 16' wall is no problem. It's the attachment at ends.

What I would do is investigate approved methods of attaching joists to both girder and ledger.
Investigate approved methods of attaching ledger to bearing wall.
Prepare all drawings based on your method.
It will be a simple matter for engineer to correct any mistakes you made. You will then redo drawings based on input from engineer and city.

For attaching girder and ledger, I would look at simpson strong tie.
(not sure if I can give company name, but you need it)
 
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