Sizing a steel beam? I? H? I'm Lost!

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  #1  
Old 12-24-14, 06:43 PM
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Sizing a steel beam? I? H? I'm Lost!

I've decided to stray away from LVL and go to steel for my up and coming home build. I just want to know what size beam I can use. This is a garage on the bottom and house on top. So this beam is support the second story.

Here are some specs:
BUILDING: 32X50 2 STORY (GARAGE ON BOTTOM/LIVING ON TOP)
Framing: 2x4s @ 16" O.C.
Headers(windows/doors): 2x6s
Garage door headers: 2x10s
Second floor joists: 11 7/8ths I-Joists @ 16" O.C.
Roof: 4/12 pitch @ 16" O.C. with no added storage.
Shingle roof. (Could I go 24" O.C. with appropriate trusses?)
Floor type: Advantec sub floor and hard wood flooring
Second story: 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, 1 kitchen, 1 living room


So this steel beam with sit on columns built on the wall made up of upright 2x8s that are glued and locked together with truss locks. I've also poured 3 pads evenly spaced down the center. These pads are for (3) 4" adjustable columns that will be helping support the beam. So the open spans between will be about 12.5 feet between the walls and support columns.

So what type, size, and strength do I need?

I beam? H beam?

8, 10, 12 inches?

Is there a beam that's strong enough where I wouldn't require the 3 adjustable columns to add more room?
 
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  #2  
Old 12-24-14, 07:06 PM
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No one should be guessing this or even asking this question on any web site.
I'm sure if you go on enough websites someone's going to give you some miss information.
You need a real striatal engineer to design it and sign off to even get a permit.
 
  #3  
Old 12-24-14, 07:09 PM
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Listen I'm not here for a lecture. I'm here for some base line information. I've also contacted structural engineers but its over the holidays and replies haven't been returned. I'm trying to get a tentative budget. Also i live in a village where no building plans have to be approved for your permit. Just size and build time. I had everything spec'd but it was with a LVL beam not a steel beam.
 
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Old 12-25-14, 05:19 AM
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Why are you going with steel when you are only spanning 12.5' ? That's easily done with LVL's and even standard lumber.

It sounds like you have already poured your footers and constructed the basement walls. If so then it's not a good time to be asking if you can span a greater distance and use fewer columns. Yes, you could increase the span distance. Unfortunately it would mean cutting the floor to pour column footers in new locations. But, losing one column would bring your span up to 16.6' which is still quite reasonable.
 
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Old 12-25-14, 08:36 AM
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I'm sorry let me clear this up a little bit. The center beam is going to be a total of 50 feet. So I would need a total of 50 feet of 3 ply LVL (3 30' pieces and 3 20' pieces). There is no basement. The bottom of the house is a slab(which has not been poured. The only thing that has been done in the foundation and 3 pads for the columns. The slab hasn't been poured because you must incase the adjust columns in concrete. This beam is for the 2nd story. I want to do steel so it's all one piece and I can drop it in with a crane. This is a lot easier than sandwiching LVL all day.
 
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Old 12-25-14, 08:57 AM
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CenterSupportBeam.pdf

****The concrete slab has not been poured*****
 
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Old 12-25-14, 05:29 PM
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What should my beam set on?

Okay so I'm going to be the guy with the stupid questions all year for my project, but im a 23 year old navy veteran that woke up 1 day and said i'm going to building my own garage/house.

The plans I have show 5 upright 2x8s attached together that the beam sits on. I plan on using a steel beam and want to know if these upright 2x8s will be fine for holding my beam or should I get steel columns to bolt to my sil/foundation to hold it up?

Just trying to get my game plan together for once spring gets here.
 
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Old 12-25-14, 05:46 PM
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We don't know what your span is, much less anything else. Why do you need steel rather than LVL?
 
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Old 12-25-14, 06:18 PM
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Okay sorry let me fill in some info on here.

Garage dimensions: 32x50 two story
2X4 framing @ 16" O.C.
4/12 Pitch room
I need a 50 foot beam in total. I have 3 footers poured to put adjustable columns for added support. The LVL would have to be 3ply and have to handle. The steel would be one piece and not as deep. The LVL i had spec'd out would be 14" in depth.
 
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Old 12-25-14, 06:38 PM
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Here is a diagram to help show you the spanning. 50' and there is 12.5 feet between each post.
Center Beam.pdf
 
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Old 12-26-14, 02:57 AM
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I have merged two of your threads. Having more than one on the same subject is confusing. Let's stick with this one for now and not start others unless the subject changes.
 
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Old 12-26-14, 05:40 AM
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Your beam does not need to be one continuous, 50' long member. Since you have columns each 12.5' span can usually be considered as one. So, you can have four 12.5' long beams. Much easier to work with and you can use longer members and overlap to help tie everything together.

Building up a LVL beam is not a big deal and is certainly easier than a 50' long steel beam. First, you'll have to do some work to locate a 50' steel beam. Anything is available if you've got the money but about 20' is a standard length many suppliers stock. I think when you look into the cost of a 50' anything and the hourly rate for a crane you will quickly be back to wood.
 
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Old 12-26-14, 07:31 AM
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I agree with the others. Your span is 12.5' not 50'. The cost of steel will be out of sight. You can lap the beam(s) so all the seams will land on your posts so you can use 24' LVLs. At a 12.5' span you could likely just use 2x10's or 12's, but I'm not an engineer.

BTW - If this is going to be heated, I would use 2x6 walls.

Is there a beam that's strong enough where I wouldn't require the 3 adjustable columns to add more room?
If you want a clear span I would suggest looking into engineered floor trusses instead of I-joists. According to the info I find on-line, a floor truss can span 32' fairly easily depending on the depth and spacing. You could also run your heating and plumbing runs through the trusses. Win win IMO.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 12-26-14 at 07:55 AM.
  #14  
Old 12-26-14, 10:05 AM
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I just feel dropping a 50' beam is a lot easier. I have two places i can get a solid 50' beam. I had an 18PSF I beam for about 1,000 dollars and a H beam at 18PSF for roughly 500. I've had an engineer from the I joist/Lvl manufacturer and the depth would of been 14" 3 ply. Totaling roughly 800 dollars. Then by the time you put all the work into combing the plys and lifting it. It just seems like a large hassle is all.

I appreciate everyone's insight very much! Anymore?
 
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Old 12-26-14, 03:11 PM
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Hassle? Just wait until you try to handle a 50' steel beam. It will take a crane that may cost up to $500 alone.
 
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Old 12-26-14, 05:10 PM
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Please define what you mean by "18PSF" when describing your prospective I and H beams. I am familiar with them being described by a height and pounds per foot but I'm not familiar with PSF.

If you were trying to preserve or maximize headroom in a basement I would understand spending the extra money (yes, it will end up costing you more) to go for a steel beam. But, since you are putting the beam in a crawlspace I am still baffled by the desire for steel... and this is coming from someone who makes everything out of steel. Well, sometimes I'll use aluminum but back to you... What you have there is a perfect application for olde fashioned wood. Even LVL's for a 12.5' span in a crawlspace is extravagant.
 
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Old 12-27-14, 12:20 PM
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There is an H beam that for about 500 dollars and a crane would be 500 dollars. If this is an acceptable beam then It will be a total of 1000. The LVL is over 700 alone.
 
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Old 12-27-14, 12:23 PM
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pounds per foot is meant. Sorry for the confusion. This I not a crawl space. This is support a second story floor above a garage. Also if I can get one that doesn't require an center columnd I can open everything up then I would love to go that route.
 
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Old 12-27-14, 02:28 PM
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Also if I can get one that doesn't require an center columnd I can open everything up then I would love to go that route
Did I mention floor trusses? Oh yeah...I did.
 
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Old 12-28-14, 03:48 PM
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Floor trusses to span 32' are very large, must be done on a 12" O.C. spacing, and very pricy. I-joists and rim board @ 16" O.C. is under 2,000. The floor trusses are roughly $5000.
 
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Old 12-29-14, 05:37 AM
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Personally I'm a fan of scissor trusses. They allow great spans and their open construction pays off big when running ducts, plumbing and electrical. The ones in my house are spaced 19.2". I oversized on the height of the truss to gain extra stiffness to avoid floor bounce but kept cost under control by using a slightly broader spacing.

32' is a long span. Since you mention 12" spacing it sounds like you looked at 18" high plate trusses. 22" or 24" would allow you to space them further apart and possibly reduce the cost by getting by with fewer trusses plus you would have no expense for columns and no central beam at all. 24" trusses would also give you gobs of room for mechanicals which can reduce their cost since it's often much easier to run without having to work around solid joists.
 
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Old 12-29-14, 07:03 PM
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That was also my point earlier, where are you going to run the mechanical's? If you use I joists anything large will need to be run under them.

According to my info a 22" truss can be spaced @ 19.2", and a 20" truss can be spaced @ 16".

I joists and rim is $2000 and trusses is $5000. Well add your beam, delivery, crane and your likely about $3500+. Plus, I doubt you will get a beam that will span 50' without posts, and if you do it will still take a lot of head space as that steel is going to be big, at least as big as an LVL. $1500 more and you will have a clear open space.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 10:29 AM
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5500 not counting delivery. Im just going to make a beam 4 2x12s wide. The walls and three supports down the center. 12.5 foot spans. 11 7/8th i joists.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 05:12 PM
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IMO - that is a better option then a steel beam.
 
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