Winter construction opinions?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-28-14, 07:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 20
Winter construction opinions?

I sadly live in Ohio where the weather is never friendly no matter what season you are in. I would like to start construction now, especially since it's been such a mild winter so far. I've seen a lot of things online talking about winter construction. I Just would like to get some of the shell up over these next couple of months.

I would be framing the first floor, wrapping it with house wrap.
Then putting in the second floor(using a water resistance sub flooring called advantec).
Then the second floor(House wrap that)
Then after that the roof trusses and so on.

What's everyone's opinions?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-28-14, 07:19 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,503
Sounds about right...........
 
  #3  
Old 12-28-14, 07:20 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 20
Do you think it's a good idea? I appreciate all your advice on previous threads.
 
  #4  
Old 12-28-14, 07:53 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,126
I assume you already have a foundation to build on.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 12-28-14, 07:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 20
Yes all the block was laid, filled with concrete, and anchor bolts set.
 
  #6  
Old 12-29-14, 12:23 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,990
One of the difficult parts is that 2 months you mentioned. They just started a new home near me 3 weeks ago and it is fully enclosed and dry now including a poured foundation. The certainty of more snow over 2 months is 100% and once everything is buried it won't melt easily,

However, that foundation should be covered with the first floor deck and some form of no moisture heat (not a no-vent propane heater) installed to keep the foundation walls and surrounding ground from freezing.

Do you have a crew or working alone with one helper?

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 12-29-14, 05:20 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,752
My concern would be the expense at this point. Anything can be done if you are willing to throw money at it. Now, already late December you are facing the two worst months for weather. Construction can continue and you might get lucky but I would expect additional costs. Vehicles may get stuck. The site may have to be dug out form snow or ice. Lumber stacks may get frozen together. Works must move more slowly on slippery frozen wood. Works can't work as fast and nimbly while wearing heavy clothing and gloves. There also tends to be more breaks to warm up and the occasional trouble with nail guns freezing and other annoyances.

Key will be planning and hitting it hard when you can. Have materials and workers ready when you get an opening in the weather. Rough framing can go amazingly fast with a good crew. I would just plan and marshal materials and when you think you'll have a good weed of weather throw everything at it. Of course everyone else will also be trying to push hard during the good weather so you'll be competing against other projects for labor and materials. Not the cheapest time to build.

You only mentioned using Advantech on the second floor deck. I would use Advantech on both floor decks as the first floor will also likely be exposed to the elements for a significant amount of time.
 
  #8  
Old 12-29-14, 05:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 20
The first floor is a garage floor and I'm building this myself with a couple of friends so no competing for weather.
 
  #9  
Old 12-29-14, 05:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,990
Reading Pilots post brings back chilling memories. What you need at this point is a framing crew who can pick that brief warm spell and get the materials onto the site and the shell up and roof dried out before it turns cold again. The costs and risks of proceeding through two months of cold and snow are high. Everything changes once the house is enclosed, windows and doors are in and the roof has a layer of underlayment to hold until shingles can be installed in warmer weather.

Basement or crawlspace?

Bud
Just to add:
Windows can take weeks to order and arrive.
Delivery trucks may not be able to put materials where you want them.
Temporary power needs to be in place.
Underground work completed before the freeze.
You may want to stretch out this phase of work, but anyone earning a living needs to get in and out and get paid.
 

Last edited by Bud9051; 12-29-14 at 06:04 AM. Reason: addition
  #10  
Old 12-29-14, 06:09 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,792
What you need at this point is a framing crew who can pick that brief warm spell and get the materials onto the site and the shell up and roof dried out before it turns cold again.
I agree! While most of us prefer to diy everything we can, sometimes it makes more sense to hire something out. When I built a dining rm onto the back of my house/trailer there was a new 2000 sq ft house being built down the road. It took me all week to dry in that room while it only took a crew of professional framing carpenters a day and half get that entire house dried in. Building in the winter requires that you take full advantage of every decent day!
 
  #11  
Old 12-29-14, 06:52 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,389
Lumber

Be sure to keep your unused lumber stacked straight and dry. Invest in a roll of 6 mil black plastic to keep the unused lumber covered.
 
  #12  
Old 12-29-14, 09:24 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,990
And don't forget the flood lights. I worked well into the dark winter hours when I did get a break in the weather, actually early morning starts as well. Security can also be an issue as even way up here in Maine good materials will grow legs if left on site too long. Be sure you have insurance coverage for materials and liability for yourself and any workers. Don't just assume your home owners policy will extend to this construction.

Bud
 
  #13  
Old 12-29-14, 10:52 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,752
I built my house. I got the foundation, basement walls and first floor deck done the first fall and called it quits in mid January (in NC) and picked up construction again in March. I'd futz around doing some work on the basement level but mostly I just stuck 2x4's down on the deck so wifey could walk the rooms and could tweak the layout before I got back at it in spring.
 
  #14  
Old 12-29-14, 10:53 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,503
For some reason I find it slightly humorous when people ask if you can work in the wintertime... as if work just grinds to a halt when it gets cold, and all carpenters must have "inside work" that's just been waiting for them. Personally, I'd rather take the winter off and fly south for the winter, but that doesn't pay the bills.

Things definitely take longer, and you put more clothes on, but you keep working. The biggest problem you will face is the time between getting the walls up and the time that the roof is closed in. When it snows inside those walls , that can be a real pain in the butt. Shovelling 12" of snow out of a framed house with no roof and no windows isn't real enjoyable. Sometimes it makes sense to build a simple temporary pitched roof out of lumber and the biggest tarp you can find. Generally you can just watch the forecast and have a couple days to get it closed in before the snow flies.

You can also protect the subfloor with a layer of 4/6 mil poly, and frame the walls on top of it. Leave this poly in place until the roof is dried in, at which point you just slice it off. It gets really slick if it gets snow on it, but it's usually worth it to protect the floor that way.

Leave all your windows boarded up- sheath right over them... don't cut the sheathing out until the day you go to set the windows. It usually makes sense to get a "bang door" from the lumber yard, which will be your temporary entrance/exit during construction. You will also likely want to lay some sacrificial plywood around outside to use for walkways so that you can largely stay out of the mud. Pallets work well for that too. You really need to adapt a strict shoe/boot policy too... in the winter you usually want to limit the amount of mud that gets tracked inside... and not just trash the inside with mud as if there wasn't anything you could do about it. A small "mudroom" area with a bench that's the designated area to change to a clean pair of boots will help keep the place a lot cleaner. If you have access to a lot of cardboard, laying that down inside helps too.

The biggest problem you see in winter stems from miserably cold workers who don't give a crap, who then do substandard work because they are cold. If you can fight that mentality and keep focused on doing quality work then there is really no difference between working in the winter and any other time of the year.
 
  #15  
Old 12-29-14, 06:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 20
I appreciate everyone's info. Picked up a solid cargo van and trailer, going to start new years day. Already got a bunch of warm clothes and spare pair of boots. Also consider 2x6 walls and called today about open span floor trusses. Waiting for quotes!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes