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92 year old House needs new floors!!!


nattybug33's Avatar
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01-27-15, 08:44 PM   #1  
92 year old House needs new floors!!!

My house is old... My house is a frame house built out of wormy chesnut. I am lacking a sublfoor (like many old homes). I currently have 3/4" red oak as my subfloor and hardwood flooring. Now I know most people say, "oh just refinish it." Well that would be great but it's saggy, wobbly, broken tongue and groove, and then there is filler pine where a partion used to be. My frame walls are built on top of this sub/hardwood floor, so cutting the planks would leave the walls in an unsupported (please correct me if I'm wrong) state. My question is what is the best route to tackle these floors? Plywood over them with glue and nails? I will be adding new supports under the house, where I have some sagging and a little bounce. The supports are massive wormy chesnut joists interlocked and upheld by rock.

Any suggestions are very welcome.

 
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01-28-15, 03:57 AM   #2  
Welcome to the forums! I drooled when you said wormy chestnut Sometimes the conventional method of repairing older homes doesn't work. If you have any substantial dips across 3 joists, you can always install 3/4" plywood in sheets to take out the boogers. If the existing flooring is sound, I would Advantech over it and apply my finished flooring. The Advantech will help stabilize the floor. No glue and intentionally miss the joists when you nail/screw it down. Use ring shank nails or decking screws to fasten it down.

We just finished two houses with water damage after the mold remediation people left. One house only had 1/2" subflooring all over. Needless to say the Advantech brought it back to life. The other house had cross hatched 1x8 oak subflooring, then red oak hardwood, then modern red oak hardwood. We removed the modern red oak down to the old and the customer is planning on new hardwood, so they won't have a problem with stability, I don't think Their original hardwoods, like yours, were not in the best cosmetic shape.

 
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01-28-15, 05:15 AM   #3  
A picture would be nice to just how bad what's there now is.
If you want to remove a layer of old flooring there is no need to remove what's under the walls.
You can cut right up to the wall with a Toe Kick saw, and a sawsall or oscillating saw for the inside corners where it will not reach.
If you do install a new subfloor use 8D ring shanked nails not screws for several reasons.
Far less expensive, faster, and screws will leave raised areas where wood gets compressed.
It needs to be fastened at least every 6", you'd soon find using screws is going to get old quick unless you have a stand up screw gun.

 
nattybug33's Avatar
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01-29-15, 04:13 PM   #4  
I love my house but I have burned up a hammer drill just driving screws into the wormy chestnut studs. Nothing is squared or even. I'll definitely check out that Advantech!!! I walk and live on it on it everyday. I just want new flooring, the old make the house look so dirty and dark. The floor has some minor waves in it, because the hardwood is the subfloor too. Nothing is on a standard centers, just stuck where ever they decided to put it at the time. Its very hard to decide on the best route. I dont want to add 4" of flooring lol, but I guess when I remodel my living room ill get that back from removing the paster, wallpaper and tongue and groove on the ceiling.

 
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01-29-15, 08:17 PM   #5  
A hammer drills the wrong tool for driving screws, should be using an impact driver.
Predrilling a pilot hole and rubbing the screw with bar soap also helps.

 
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