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How would you add on to this garage?


jmnew51's Avatar
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NJ

05-22-15, 04:54 PM   #1  
How would you add on to this garage?

We would like to add a second garage onto the side of this existing garage - would this be possible? How do we deal with the roof line, for example? Any estimate on cost? It looks in the picture that the AC and meter box will have to be moved - how difficult would this be? Also, what if we wanted to extend the house portion along with the garage, which is further back, behind the existing garage - do you see any problems with that? Roof line, for example. Please give us your best advice - we're considering purchasing, but would need the additional garage and possible house space. Please see picture. Thanks so very much!
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7164...n3gvVooR5w!2e0

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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05-22-15, 05:35 PM   #2  
Adding onto both would the the most feasible option. If the right end of the house got longer, say by 12'... your garage would also be 12' longer. The garage roof would simply get ripped off and redone with a larger, taller gable, which would then be built back to the other roof, with 2 valleys just like it has now. The look would remain the same, just bigger.

Or, you could completely remove the existing garage and driveway and build a new addition onto the right elevation that matches the height and size of the roof line on the left side of the house. Then build your new 2 car garage onto the end of that new addition with a gable end.

Remodelling is expensive. The larger the addition, the cheaper it will be per sq ft, so the sky is the limit. But your best bet is to get local estimates. Anything we say here will be trumped by your local contractors. For instance if you were in Nebraska, I'd be glad to give you a ballpark price that would end up paying me $50/hr. However if you're in Paramus or Atlantic City, those rates would probably be way off.

Let's say you go with the first suggestion and add 12' x 30' onto the house. 360 sq ft. You would be hard pressed to do that for under $100 per sq ft.

 
joecaption's Avatar
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05-22-15, 05:37 PM   #3  
Going have to get some local quotes, it's not gong to be cheap.

 
Furd's Avatar
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05-22-15, 05:47 PM   #4  
Extending to the right would be a fairly straightforward job IF it were allowed by the LOCAL zoning board. There are rules that prescribe the minimum setbacks from property lines as well as maximum amount of the lot that can be covered by structures that need to be known. The job would require approved plans and a building permit.

Estimating costs over the Internet is an almost impossible task because of differences in material costs, labor costs, design costs and permitting costs. I would guesstimate the electrical change alone would be a minimum of $1,000 and could go as high as $3,000 or $4,000. Moving the air conditioning condenser along with extended refrigerant piping and electrical could easily be another $2,000 to $3,000 and at that point you need to see if completely replacing the entire system might not be more economical over the life of the equipment. The second garage itself would probably be at minimum another $40,000 and could be double that depending on unknown variables.

So right there you have close to $50k and maybe closer to $100k. Does the house and neighborhood support adding that kind of money to the purchase price of the house as is considering what may happen over the period of time that you will own the house?

 
Handyone's Avatar
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05-22-15, 07:13 PM   #5  
Your first step, as stated above, should be to check local setback requirements and lot coverage.
You might not even be able to build out to the right. Hopefully the side setback is only 10 feet, but you need to verify and see what you could gain from that.


Brian
Cal Contractor

 
jmnew51's Avatar
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05-31-15, 11:06 AM   #6  
We made an offer on the house. We decided to add onto the back of the house, that way we don't have to move the A/C unit or the electric meter. The setback to the right is only 10 feet, so that would be cutting it close. 30 feet to the rear of the property, that's seems more feasible.

Thank you for all of your advice.

Jim

 
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