Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Framing, Flooring and Sub-Flooring
Reload this Page >

How do I level a stud that lays on a very irregular concrete floor?

How do I level a stud that lays on a very irregular concrete floor?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-11-15, 03:38 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 96
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How do I level a stud that lays on a very irregular concrete floor?

The original 2x4 that rested on the floor was removed in one piece with approx. 7" of the vertical studs attached to it. (This was under a closed set of 6 stairs that was removed first.) One side of the studs rested against a concrete block wall. The removal was done to allow access to the cold joint for the application of a waterproofing material whose surface is varied and uneven. Now I'd like to install a new 2x4, hopefully with closely matching 7" studs attached to it to be sistered in, since all the original studs were partly rotted from flooding. I can't drill down into the concrete floor because it would disturb the waterproofing, but need something to serve as "shims." I'm concerned about using construction adhesive of some kind since I think I need more time to do the fitting even if I check everything first. I'm an amateur at this sort of thing.
 
  #2  
Old 10-11-15, 04:25 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I can imagine the end of a stud setting on a concrete floor but I can't imagine one laying on a concrete floor. Could you post some pictures?
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-15, 06:08 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,854
Received 83 Votes on 78 Posts
Trying to water proof from the inside was a total waste of time and money.
It needed to be done outside.
Gutters, slope running away from the foundation, no mulch or flower beds against the foundation, may even need a french drain.
No unpressure treated lumber should have been against the concrete.
 
  #4  
Old 10-12-15, 07:10 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,740
Received 22 Votes on 21 Posts
Stud

I can imagine the end of a stud setting on a concrete floor but I can't imagine one laying on a concrete floor.
Sounds like a bottom plate. Some may call it a sole plate.
 
  #5  
Old 10-12-15, 10:48 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 96
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry. I don't have the capability to post pictures. The work so far was done by the regional manager of the waterproofing company. He's located about 300 miles away and isn't well. He's unlikely to be able to return to complete the project and I've had 3 carpenters look at it who are unwilling to take it on.

A french drain was part of the original construction of the house in 1971 and when that couldn't handle the run off, 200' of pvc pipe which slopes away from the house was added. Gutters are well-maintained and the overhang from the roof is substantial. There are no plants around the foundation. The rest of the basement was also treated inside with the waterproofing product. It's holding up well.

I'm not terribly concerned that the lumber used before wasn't pressure treated since it was installed 44 years ago and lasted this long. I'm 70, so...

I don't know if the bottom plate or sole plate was attached to the floor since that area is now hidden by the waterproofing stuff. I wonder about building a replacement unit of the 2 x 4s and, after fitting it in well so it sits on mortar of some kind, forcing more mortar under it to fill the gaps.

The stairs were nailed through the stringers with galvanized finishing nails on that side (one into each stud) and by some kind of masonry fasteners (2 through the stringer an inch above the first stair tread from the top, where the stairs are directly against the concrete block wall. That part + reinstalling the stairs will be the next nightmare I'll be dealing with. The bottom stair riser + stringers rest directly on the (irregular) floor.

I tried to avoid over-detailing at first, but maybe some of this helps. I appreciate the suggestions and comments.
 
  #6  
Old 10-13-15, 11:12 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 314
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Fritzy, Sorry, I'm not a skilled mason or general contractor, so I'm not a good one to answer your questions, but I know that, even after reading your post a couple of times, I have a really hard time visualizing your situation. I'm guessing that the pros who contribute to this forum might also have a hard time picturing what you're up against.
My suggestion is to find someone with a digital camera to come over and take a few pictures for us. Have him or her put the pictures on a thumb drive or E-mail them to you. Then you can attach the pictures to your post. Heck, most people with cell phones have the ability to take pictures and E-mail them to you.

Good luck.
 
  #7  
Old 10-13-15, 11:28 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 750
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The best I can understand is that you need to put a new bottom wall plate on the floor, but it is now too irregular due to the waterproofing treatment to sit perfectly flat. I am also assuming this is not a load bearing wall. If that is the case, just sit the plate in place, and cut your new studs to fit snug, after it is all reframed, double check that the plate is where you want it, and spray foam under any parts that are off the floor. That will be enough to glue the plate in place to prevent movement without affecting the waterproofing treatment.
 
  #8  
Old 10-14-15, 12:49 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 96
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, Keith. Your understanding is correct. Is the spray foam you suggested insulating gap filler? Interesting idea. Do you thing it would be better than mortar (possibly made from the waterproofing material)? I'll still need to figure out how to level the floor at the bottom of the stairs and then install a new self-hung door in the lumpy doorway and may have to use the waterproofing material there. I do plan to use pressure treated lumber. By the way, three carpenters looked at this project--one before the door and stairs were removed and two after. They weren't willing to take it on.
 
  #9  
Old 10-14-15, 02:40 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 750
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, that same spray foam gap filler you would use around a door or window. As long as the wall is not load bearing, this will work great as that spray foam makes an excellent adhesive. Morter will fill the gap but it will do little to hold the wall from moving around.

The fact that three carpenters said they would not touch it suggests to me that they don't think what is there has been done properly, and therefore they do not want any responsibility to be put on them if something goes wrong.
 
  #10  
Old 10-22-15, 07:02 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 96
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The quality of the previous carpentry work is fine. It's all about the lumpy floor, especially where the bottom step (and stringers) land. The stair unit is very heavy (oak) and a tight fit.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: