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Making a thinner interior wall?


JTLDIY's Avatar
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11-07-15, 06:04 AM   #1  
Making a thinner interior wall?

Not a load bearing wall

I need an additional 1-2 inches in a bathroom - can you turn a 2 x 4 width wise when you frame the wall to make it only 2 inches thick and still be in code?

There will be no electrical or plumbing or anything in the wall it is simply a "divide" between bathroom & hallway

It will be about 9 ft long

Thanks

 
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11-07-15, 06:15 AM   #2  
I have to ask the inevitable question.....why? What difference will 2" make? The wall may have stability problems since you will be turning the stable factors (studs) sideways, and it could tend to bow. Not a good idea, but certainly not against "code". Remember "code" is the very MIMIMUM you can get away with.

 
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11-07-15, 06:25 AM   #3  
answer to the WHY?! question - Standard bathtub wont fit otherwise
Hallway size can't be adjusted because of door openings to other bedrooms

Seriously ridiculous that an inch (ish) can cause such problems but it is & I can't think of another option

 
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11-07-15, 06:37 AM   #4  
Is it an inch you need or two. Do you have the physical tub on site. they tend sometimes to run a little shy for a 60 inch opening. You can also notch the studs to fit it in rather than building a thin wall. What kink of tub walls are going up, it is part of a kit?

 
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11-07-15, 06:45 AM   #5  
Tub walls - tile with cement backer board

maybe I could just turn the 2 studs that are interfering with the tub?
I haven't ordered the tub yet because am concerned to do all this work & then have it fall apart at the end

 
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11-07-15, 06:48 AM   #6  
Mobile homes often use 2x2s for stud walls so it can be done, it just won't be as stout. Will there be a door in this wall? Have you considered using a MH tub? they are typically 3'-4" shorter than a standard tub.


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11-07-15, 07:10 AM   #7  
If a tile wall, then definitely will need a solid wall. Send us a link to the tub you are considering and the exact stud to stud measurements. Remember to subtract for any existing sheetrock. You may have to subtract more if the wall is plaster. To get an exact measurement, I take a yard stick and stick in to the wall from one side, take a measuring tape hard to the other wall and read where they meet in the middle. Then add the 36"or 48" depending on your measuring stick.

 
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11-07-15, 07:36 AM   #8  
czizzi - Sure will then will post again after I have all the details - Thanks

Trying to get the picture plan on paper before demolition & a bit at the beginning phases - going to take all this great info & see what solutions I am to come up with

 
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11-07-15, 07:38 AM   #9  
Just want clarification. You are measuring from stud to stud, and not wall covering to wall covering, such as existing sheetrock or cbu?

 
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11-07-15, 07:42 AM   #10  
chandler - measured dry wall to dry wall & subtracted the thickness of the drywall - not down to the studs yet because we aren't 100% our goal/plans will work yet

 
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11-07-15, 07:59 AM   #11  
I did the same on the last tub R&R I did, just to find it was 1/2" too short for the new shower unit. Original contractor had installed 2 layers of sheetrock, apparently to make up space for some reason. There was my spacing I needed.

 
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11-07-15, 08:50 AM   #12  
measured dry wall to dry wall & subtracted the thickness of the drywall
I'm sure it is just a typo, but you ADD the thickness of the drywall to get the rough opening. Take a cover plate off the light switch to see the thickness of the wall. You can also measure the thickness of the door jamb to see if there is anything other than a normal single layer of drywall. Standard drywall door jamb is 4 9/16" wide.

 
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11-07-15, 11:16 AM   #13  
Not sure of the prices, but a quick search for shorter tubs indicates there are many choices. Unless you and others are really tall, 4" less tub should bot be an issue. Most people only use the tub as a shower stall anyway.
Here is a tub/shower combo: TR3 542874 R-L-C | Diamond Tub & Showers
Mark mentioned mobile home tubs, so there is one place to start.

Bud

 
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11-07-15, 06:03 PM   #14  
If you only need an inch, I'd suggest you go with 2x3's rather than turning 2x4's sideways.

 
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11-07-15, 06:33 PM   #15  
2x3 is a great idea X, but I think that he will find that things will fit after all. I have found that the 1/4" to 1/2" that the tub is short is the usual obstacle, not the wall itself.

 
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