Flooded Shop

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  #1  
Old 03-31-16, 10:20 AM
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Flooded Shop

I looked over the forum sections twice & just didnt see a good place to put this as I am sure its probably never been discussed before. So, where should I put this thread?

I am sure most of you know we've had flooding from east TX to Ms. I am in north La & out home/property got flooded. We are currently out of the house & living elsewhere.

Question:
My shop flooded. Its a 24 X 16 wood frame "piddling/hobby" shop on 8" cinder blocks with a plywood floor. It got about a foot of water in it so I gotta tear out the walls & flooring. When I built this in 2001, I had just enough basic knowledge on framing etc, to mess it up & I didn't get it level nor totally square. In short, since I have to do some rebuilding now, my intent is to get everything out of the shop, tear out the flooring, jack it up & put more at least another 8" possibly 16" of cinder blocks & level it.

I need to know what & where to look for &/or get jacks, air bags or whatever I need to get this jacked whole building jacked up to that height & level it.

So where do I post this "jack up" thread for feed back, advice on the project & what equipment to look for to do the job?
 
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Old 03-31-16, 10:30 AM
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Maybe in framing ?

I'd use bottle jacks and raise it a little at a time using cribbing to hold it up.
 
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Old 03-31-16, 02:00 PM
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You can rent jacks. You would run a temporary beam about 18" inches from the edge and using (in this case) three jacks to raise it. When raised you would then put your blocks under the building, verify they are level and lower the building to them. Remove the temporary beam and jacks and your done.

That's the basics. Best to do booth sides at once. If you are low to the ground you may need to use side lift jacks* or dig holes for the jacks. You may need to do it in two or more lifts. Jack as high as you can. Block the temporary beams. put blocking under the jacks and raise more. Always go around rotating lifting just a bit with each jack.

Use solid concrete blocks not the ones with voids and rest them on 16"x16"x4" pads.

*Railroad jacks are especially handy if you are too low to the ground. They have a lift hook on the side give a good amount of lift.

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Old 03-31-16, 06:33 PM
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I would consider lifting a single wall an inch or, at most, two inches, to replace a rotted sill plate or repair rotted stud ends but raising an entire building eight to sixteen inches (or more) to raise the foundation is NOT what I would consider to be a DIY job.

Not that it couldn't be done but definitely not by this kid, even in my most reckless years.
 
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Old 03-31-16, 06:44 PM
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Pictures sure would be nice so we can see what your seeing.
 
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Old 03-31-16, 06:48 PM
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I'm with Furd on this one.
What's going to keep everything from tipping over just sitting on jacks?
 
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Old 03-31-16, 08:19 PM
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What's going to keep everything from tipping over just sitting on jacks?
If you use two temporary beams, one on each side, perpendicular to the joists and jack each jack in small increments of an inch or less it will never be tilted enough to tip over. There is risk though and you could end up under a pile of rubble.
 
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Old 03-31-16, 11:46 PM
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With proper "cribbing" it most assuredly is possible to raise a building if you have enough jacks AND use them properly. It is not a difficult job for a professional that has the equipment and supplies BUT as I stated previously it is generally NOT a DIY job. It takes a lot of cribbing, sometimes steel beams the length of the building and a whole lot of expertise.

House movers do it all the time and that is where I would concentrate my efforts in finding a professional to do the work. They need to be insured and bonded as well as having a trained crew who know how to use the equipment. Some jurisdictions will require specialized licensing over and above that normally required by a construction company.

If this is "just a shop" without any special interior construction then "de-construction" in a controlled manner and then rebuilding may be more cost effective, especially for DIY, than having a pro raise the existing building. There is also the total cost of the new foundation to consider and that could include a new floor slab.
 
 

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