Framing not level

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  #1  
Old 04-15-16, 03:44 PM
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Framing not level

So I attempted to do one more basement wall last night before calling it a day and did not level the 4" side of the 2x4 framing. I walked in this am and saw it right away. The 2 in side is nice and level but I must have forgot to run the level on the 4 in side before shot the nails into the top plate. They are only off about 1/2 from top to bottom. Will I need to tear this down and redo...will the building inspector make me? The doorway was framed 2 inches bigger so there should not be a problem there (and it is non load bearing). Only issue will be drywall might be tricky on that one section although it's exactly 8 feet so one sheet will cover it.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 04:03 PM
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Walls need to be plumb... especially when they have doors in them. Pull your top plate nails out with a cats paw or cut them loose with a sawzall and plumb your wall. You should have plumbed the ends and snapped a chalkline on the ceiling and floor.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 06:04 PM
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I did use a Bob and snapped a chalk line. The walls are straight up and down when measured on the 2 inch side of the 2x4 (the side facing you) with a level. Its the vertical section of the 4inch section of the 2x4 that is off (if the makes sense). So if you stand in front of the studs they are not pefectly up and down they are slightly to the right at the top....like this // (but not that extreme). When i tipped up the wall and lined it up with the chalk lines I never tapped the top over a half inch or so.
As for the door won't this have to be leveled separetly when it is installed (with shims as the rough opening is 2in bigger)? The only issue I see is drywall as the stud might not be there when you go to screw it thinking it is perfectly perpendicar to the floor. Agan this is only a 8 foot section. I plan on cutting the nails and toe nailing straight to fix it but just want to know why as it is not load bearing.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 06:31 PM
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I see... You are saying that when you place the level on the side of a stud, they are not plumb. But the front of the wall is plumb. That's not as big of a deal since the prehung door will be shimmed plumb. I was imagining you were saying the wall was leaning in or out.

I would still fix it as it would drive me nuts... by cutting either the top or bottom loose and renailing it. But it's your house and if you are hanging the sheet rock then you don't have anything to worry about.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 06:43 PM
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Thanks Xsleeper. It is already driving me nuts...exactly why I am posting about it and will fix it. Just out of curiosity is there any code against this, I searched and could not find any.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 07:54 PM
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No, building codes don't cover what you might refer to as "building standards". As you know, different carpenters have different standards. To someone with crooked eyes, 1/2" in 8' might be okay. Others split hairs. Most carpenters are somewhere in between. Published guides are sometimes used as a benchmark so that everyone is on the same page.

Building standards are available in published form, although I doubt most of us have ever read them. Some larger companies, home builders, high end remodellers, etc probably have adapted one standard or another just so that they have a benchmark for their work. Some of the time the benchmark is set pretty low (NAHB's Residential Construction Performance Guidlines Fourth Edition states "no more than 3/8" in 32") (SCRC and NASCLA "no more than 1/4" in 32") which is still quite crooked if extended to 8'... others are more reasonable than that worst case scenario.

Most self respecting framers will strive for perfection because they pride themselves on their work, but they also realize that it's not usually possible to acheive perfection on a big project due to accumulated variations that are out of their ability to control or correct. Myself, I have always subscribed to +/- 1/4" in 10' for plumb... (don't know why... think i read it somewhere once and it stuck). Some drywall guides will recommend 1/4" in 8' for framing, maybe that's why. Lasers also have a tolerance which varies depending on the quality and accuracy of the laser.

The longer the level, the more accurate you will be. That's why framers use plate levels. Trim carpenters install door jambs with 78" levels. A short level when installing a door just brings too much inaccuracy into the picture.
 
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Old 04-16-16, 05:31 AM
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Wall

Cut the top plate loose from the ceiling joists and shift it 1/2" and re-nail. Should not be a big deal to correct. These things drive me nuts, too. ( A note on terminology: Vertical members are plumb or out of plumb; horizontal members are level.)
 
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