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Replacing subfloor room by room?


Pfila88's Avatar
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05-10-16, 09:58 PM   #1  
Replacing subfloor room by room?

Hey everyone, hope all is well! I've been seeing a few different ways to tackle this project and was just curious of everyone's opinion on it.

I'm in the process of redoing my entire kitchen and now that everything is gutted, the original subfloor (1/2 inch). It is pretty shot all over, especially on the entire perimeter of the kitchen and mostly near where the sink and dishwasher were(leaks of course). I really wanted to completely take out the subfloor but what I'm being told by the person who's helping me do the flooring, is that I can't do the subfloor in just the kitchen, because it would compromise the wall on 1 side of the kitchen that the subfloor runs underneath of, which also creaks and has a slight bounce like the kitchen had. The current plan is the patch up the original subfloor and then put new 3/4 inch on top of it (height isn't an issue because of how the dining room flooring was installed with essentially 2 layers of plywood...only salvageable flooring in the house) The joists and the subfloor currently run perpendicular from each other so I was under the assumption that I can remove the subfloor up until the wall, or an inch or 2 away, and install the new subfloor right up to it.

The house is kinda old and the rooms that have original flooring all have 1/2 inch subfloor that creak and even have a little bounce to it. My plan is to change the flooring thruout the entire house in the future but I'm tackling the home, room by room. So in essence I'd like to do new flooring and sub flooring in about 75% of the house, but don't have the luxury of gutting the house down to just the exterior walls to do brand spanking new sub floor everywhere. Any thoughts on how I should go about this?

Thanks in advanced!

 
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marksr's Avatar
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05-11-16, 02:36 AM   #2  
I'm not sure what your helper is thinking? Replacing the subfloor in one room and not the next shouldn't have any effect on the wall. Even if you replace the subfloor in both rooms the stud wall will still have suspect subfloor under it - not that there is a lot you can do about. Is there any rot under the stud wall?


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05-11-16, 03:32 AM   #3  
The bounce is caused by either the subflooring, which is inadequate in thickness or lack of support or sizing of the floor joists. Of course we can't tell about the joisting. If you are replacing it all eventually, applying 3/4" Advantech as subflooring would be a great start. Temporarily you will have a transition from room to room until it is all done, but you need the added thickness. I am not sure what is meant by your helper's comments as making the subflooring consistent throughout won't affect the walls. Where the joists run parallel to the wall, you can add sistering to the rim to give the edge more of a landing.

 
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05-11-16, 05:04 AM   #4  
No, the stud wall subfloor is fine and sits right on top of a joist.

 
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05-11-16, 05:11 AM   #5  
That's in essence what I was trying to get to the bottom of, will making the subfloor consistent have any affect on the interior walls, I'm fine with having a transition for a little while, there's a transition going into almost every single room as of now. So gutting the subfloor in every room by room and replacing it with 3/4 advantech wont effect the walls that have original subfloor underneath them. Right?

 
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05-11-16, 05:21 AM   #6  
The stud walls are nailed thru the subfloor into the floor joists. Replacing the subfloor next to the stud wall won't affect the integrity of the stud wall. Replacing the subfloor in one room and not the adjacent room won't affect the stud wall either.


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05-11-16, 05:28 AM   #7  
So gutting the subfloor in every room by room and replacing it with 3/4 advantech wont effect the walls that have original subfloor underneath them. Right?
Gutting the subfloor will only affect walls parallel to the joists that are currently sitting ONLY on the subfloor (between joists). This happens more often than you think. As Larry mentioned, you will probably find quite a few areas where you will need to add additional blocking- either between the joists, or between the joist and the rim because the subfloor will need something to nail to on each side of any interior wall that is parallel to the joists.

Going over the top of the existing subfloor would be a better idea, imo.

 
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05-11-16, 05:40 AM   #8  
So @xsleeper your vote is patch up the original subfloor where it's rotted and then just go over it with the new plywood on top. Sorry this is just my first big renovation and want to do everything right so when I tackle the next rooms, I don't have any regrets.

 
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05-11-16, 05:43 AM   #9  
So @marksr your vote is to replace the original subfloor up until the stud walls, if in fact the stud walls are running right on top/parallel of the joists, right?

 
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05-11-16, 05:57 AM   #10  
IMO it depends on what needs done, I've done it both ways. I've patched a lot of mobile home floors and then laminate the entire floor with plywood. Patching and laminating has less challenges than complete replacement. If you only need to patch small areas it often makes more sense to do that and then install another layer of plywood on top. How wavy is the existing subfloor?


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05-11-16, 09:58 AM   #11  
It's a 10' X 14' kitchen and I'd say there's a good amount of wave to it, probably about 40-50% of the subfloor has some wave, but seems like there's more dry rot, almost everywhere you step in between joists you hear a solid crunch of the plywood.

 
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05-11-16, 10:19 AM   #12  
Yes, that's what I'm suggesting. Unless height is an issue, (like sliding a dishwasher under the counter, or exterior doors that won't clear when they swing in) overlay the existing. The 3/4 ply will span any dips. I don't think you realize what a pain it will be to cut around every wall and cabinet unless you have the right tools to do it. If you have other reasons to open up the floor then maybe it would be worth it. If you do, you might consider getting a toe kick saw if you go that route, it will save you a lot of headaches.

 
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