Identiying Load Bearing Wall for Stud Removal

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  #1  
Old 06-08-16, 08:02 PM
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Identiying Load Bearing Wall for Stud Removal

Hi All!

So I know that it's possible to remove a single stud from a load bearing wall, given proper replacement with jack studs, header, cripples, etc... However I'd like to identify first if the wall I'm working with is load bearing or not. I have attached some pictures that I hope will be sufficient to make a determination or at least a very educated guess.

Quick description: The house is a 2 story colonial with 2 stair cases, directly above each other in the center of the house (one leading from the front door to 2nd story, and the other directly beneath leading from the 1st floor to the basement). The wall in question is in the basement adjacent to the basement stairs and under the 1st-2nd floor stairs.

Normally, based on the wall location, I would say that it's not load bearing, being that the wall runs along and directly underneath a single floor joist. The only thing that's tripping me up is that the joist it runs along is a double joist that I assume is carrying the load of the stringers/stairs above. Because of that, could those two small walls in the basement be load bearing for the floor/stairs above?

Thanks in advance.

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  #2  
Old 06-08-16, 08:20 PM
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Doubt it's load bearing. The joists on either side of a stair case are always doubled, they have to be since they carry the load of the joists inbetween that are headed off (in hangers). Can't say if the doubled joist would be over spanned if the wall wasn't there, but doesn't sound like you are removing the whole wall, just one stud. You have my blessing to remove it. LOL

We also don't know anything about 2nd story framing which, yes, can have a bearing on it... (pun intended). We dont know what was used for the ceiling spanning the dining room... the joists "should" be parallel to the handrail. If that is a header over the dining room entryway, the base of the king and trimmers at the left handrail attachment point would be a point load, meaning there would be added dead load in that spot... which would correspond roughly to the 5th/6th step from the bottom in the basement. Not that it means anything, but that spot might be where the most load is concentrated. Can't do the math, don't know the sq ft and I'm not an engineer or an architect. (Above my pay grade). LOL

Looks like the only reason the walls are there is so that they could hang and finish the drywall in the stairway.

If you don't need to remove all of that stud, you could always head it off below the cleat. Might save the drywall from being damaged on the opposite side.
 
  #3  
Old 06-08-16, 08:29 PM
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Thanks for the quick reply, excellent response...and thanks for the blessing lol. Just to be safe, even if it were load bearing, removing that stud and replacing with a properly sized doubled up header, jack studs, etc... just as a window is framed would be sufficient anyway, right?
 
  #4  
Old 06-08-16, 08:36 PM
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Yep, you've got the right idea... but I'm pretty sure you don't have to go to that extent if it's not load bearing. Only one top plate there too.
 
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