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attaching new wood stud wall to exsisting wall


xfrank12's Avatar
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07-12-16, 03:52 PM   #1  
attaching new wood stud wall to exsisting wall

40' long wood stud wall. 2X4 studs.
10' long section in the middle rotted.
I have to replace the floor, sole plate, studs and top plate for the 10' section.
My question is, do i need to anchor ,sister or someway secure the new wall to the existing wall?
I was planning on making the first and last stud of the new wall flush with the studs of the exsisting wall and nail the new studs to the old studs.
What about where the new sole plate and top plate meet the exsisting sole plate and top plate? Should they be fastened together somehow?

 
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07-13-16, 03:27 AM   #2  
You will need to support that 10' section of wall with a false wall before you begin deconstruction. Otherwise it will definitely sag if it is a load bearing wall, as it appears from your description. And, yes, keep your 16" oc spacing, but tie the wall into the old wall via offset on the double top plate. Bottom plate is fine in one piece. Also sister a stud against each good stud to help support the entire wall in combination with the other walls.

 
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07-13-16, 12:57 PM   #3  
It is a supporting wall. False wall is already in, demolition has started. But, thanks for the warning.
I understood everything else you said except for "into the old wall via offset on the double top plate".
I know what the double top plate is, but not sure what you mean by an offset. Could you link me to a photo?
Thanks.

 
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07-13-16, 01:14 PM   #4  
I think he means that the double top plate should not be two 10ft 2x4 slipped into the gap. You can use one 10ft piece as the top portion but for the bottom layer, cut back some of the existing bottom layer on the good wall and use a 12ft or maybe two 6ft pieces. Think about stacking bricks, if all the ends are even, you get a lot less strength than if you stagger the joints on each row. You just need to stagger the joints on top plate.

- Peter

 
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07-28-16, 02:23 PM   #5  
Anyone familiar with Ellis manufacturing screw jacks?
I need a jack to raise the floor ,under this wall ,to replace the rotted wood ontop of the footing.
Are these jacks any good? What country are they made in?

 
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