Garage conversion to bedroom

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Old 07-18-16, 02:36 PM
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Garage conversion to bedroom

I'm in the process of converting a 11x10 garage to a kids bedroom. My plan is to toe nail the floor joists with PT 2x4 over a 6 Mil vapor barrier, insulating between the joists with R10 XPS rigid foam and then a layer of 3/4 ply with carpet. The 2x4 will be sitting on the slab as I don't have the height to come up any higher. My concern is am I headed in the right direction? I just want to make sure I don't run into any problems in the future as far as mold.

I will also insulation the ceiling with R19 and the walls with R13. I'm located on Long Island, New York, for we get some cold winters and hot summers. Will these R numbers work? Any input you have will help me
 
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Old 07-18-16, 02:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

My first concern is what kind of moisture do you have coming up through the slab?

Wait - do you mean 'vapor' barrier when you say 'paper' barrier?
 
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Old 07-18-16, 02:48 PM
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Sorry yes it should say vapor. The slab is dry. I never had water in the garage and it never seems wet or damp.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 02:51 PM
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Have you done a moisture test? It's where you tape a piece of plastic down to the slab for a couple days to see what amount of water accumulates under it.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 02:58 PM
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i'll do that tonight.. can I just use a black garbage bag? I haven't bought any supplies yet until I nail down what I'm going to do.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 03:54 PM
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Hi mp and welcome to the forum.
Check to see what permits are required and be sure all improvements meet code minimums. I realize many people don't want to start that way, but each town has their requirements and we can only guess.

Long Island is zone 4 with minimum r-38 in ceiling, r-13 walls, and r-19 floors: https://energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCod...ate=New%20York

Those numbers are from the 2009 codes and your area may have upgraded to newer requirements. Thus you need to check.

I believe you will need a window that meets the egress requirements and you will want some heat and electric out there.

Bud
 
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Old 07-18-16, 04:33 PM
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Thank you for this Bud. I'll def go with these numbers. As for the floor I can't seem to find any rigid xps over R10 locally for the floor. Am I able to double up the R10 will that be the same?

As for the window I have a larger one on order. Just starting to frame the floor out to raise it a little to add insulation.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 04:33 PM
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Use something clear..... even food wrap or a baggie will work. You need to see thru it.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 04:57 PM
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We usually think of moisture as liquid water, but there is another beast that causes just as many problems, moisture vapor. Moisture vapor moves from wet to dry and can move through the soil and even your concrete floor. The reason your floor looks dry is that the moisture vapor is passing directly to the air instead of accumulating. That is the test PJ is the test ss and PJ are talking about where the test vapor barrier will cause any moisture passing through to accumulate as water under the plastic. The test isn't perfect as it only says that today there is or isn't a moisture problem. But it is a start.

Rigid insulation is usually r-5 per inch or Polyisocyanurate at r-6.5 per inch. And yes you can double it up just stagger the seams.

Bud
 
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Old 07-28-16, 07:26 PM
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So its been a while and I have not had any moisture in my moisture test. I played 2 sections down in 2 different areas and both have been moisture free.
 
 

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