Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Interior Ramp


Raccroc's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 20
TX

12-16-16, 10:48 AM   #1  
Interior Ramp

I have a small single-wide. manufactured home with a living room add-on. The add-on has a concrete floor sitting at ground level, about 14" below the rest of the home. The main entrance is the add-on living room, which has two large steps leading to the rest of the house.

My plans is to turn the house into a guest for friends and family. Unfortunately, my father is forced to use a cane or wheeled walker and can not navigate the steps w/o a lot of effort and help.

14" high.
13'6" wide room.

Due to the location of doors and such, a turning ramp is not practical.

Anybody know what is the minimum rise/run that id still usable would be?
Possible other options or suggestions to an undersized ramp?

 
Sponsored Links
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,327
NE

12-16-16, 10:55 AM   #2  
Maximum slope is 1:12, so a 14" rise would require 168" of run.... bigger than your room. A wheel chair lift might be more practical in the long run.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,811
TN

12-16-16, 11:51 AM   #3  
I built one once where space was a premium and had to make it a 1.5" rise per foot which isn't ADA approved. It worked ok but the guy in the wheelchair always had someone to help push. And again that takes up too much of the room. I like the chair lift idea!


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
Raccroc's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 20
TX

12-16-16, 12:02 PM   #4  
My understanding (which, admittedly, may be wrong) is 1:12 is the maximum for unassisted wheelchair access, with 1:20 being the ideal. Wheelchair access is easy, as a person can just be pushed. Walker access has me concerned due to the slip and fall aspect.

What I am looking for is a more practical max, for use in this space. Even if some assistance is needed, what is the steepest slope that can be navigated? It is easy to see that 1:2 would be way worse than the steps. But what about 1:9?

Ideal… no.
Better…?

A lift might be a solution, not sure I have room for both steps and a lift in that space. I will definitely have a look into that though.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,327
NE

12-16-16, 12:06 PM   #5  
You could also get a powered stair lift. (Chair)

https://www.google.com/search?q=chai...UUgCokQgTYI7AQ

 
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 39,968
GA

12-16-16, 01:19 PM   #6  
Nothing is going to change the code on this. It won't matter if there is assistance available or not. The code is written to protect the entire spectrum of disabilities. Aside from the lifts mentioned, a landing with ramp to the side, then another landing with a reverse in the ramp until the proper pitch is achieved would be the only way to get around it.

 
Raccroc's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 20
TX

12-17-16, 07:07 AM   #7  
Don't want to change the code...don't. CARE about the code. The code is not "written to protect", it is written to do all sorts of things, like protect, provide independence, give comfort, etc. Furthermore, I couldn't care less about "broad spectrum" either.

Here are the facts as I know them…

1. I have two large 7" steps which cannot navigated by walker or wheelchair.
2. This is a small country farmhouse, so no codes, permits, inspections, etc. are of any concern whatsoever.
3. I believe a ramp, even if not ideal, is infinitely better than the complete obstacle which the steps currently impose.
4. If this were a "wheelchair only" scenario, I would have skipped all this and just put in a 5-6' ramp (used a couple of trailer ramps when a buddy visited while in a wheelchair…worked great).
5. The next 2-3 years, for 5-6 days of the year, and mostly just at night… that is all I expect to need this. That means spending thousands on a complete remodel or lift is likely out.
6. The only thing I do care about is one person, who is using a wheeled chair walker, being able to get up and down safely with assistance.

So again…does anybody know/think if I were to do something like a 1:8 ramp, would that suffice? Any building tips to help make it as safe as possible given my constraints?

Thanks everyone for the input so far. It is appreciated.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,327
NE

12-17-16, 07:24 AM   #8  
Do what you want then... why ask us. No one wants to give bad advice they would be liable for.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,811
TN

12-17-16, 07:25 AM   #9  
I don't know a lot about it but there are gov't programs that may help pay for reno's or devices to help the disabled. Might be something to check into and see if your father qualifies.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 39,968
GA

12-17-16, 07:30 AM   #10  
Build your 1:8 ramp. Put very sturdy hand rails on both sides with graspable rails at 34" off the ramp's deck, because they will be needed. I am not advocating the steeper incline of the ramp, but you seem to be adamant in your attempt to do something and just want blessings. The handrails will, at least, give some margin of safety when the wheel chair or walker person cannot control the descent. I'm not even going to address the width necessary for ADA.

https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADA...Astandards.htm

 
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 32,376
TX

12-17-16, 09:29 AM   #11  
Alternate suggestion if no wheel chair is likely to be used: Make the steps deep enough front to back to accommodate a person and walker plus at least six inches.

Just my opinion this would be safer then a ramp for a walker because the slope of the ramp might tend to cause the user to lean forward and slip.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,327
NE

12-17-16, 09:35 AM   #12  
When my grandpa was still alive, i made new stringers for his steps that overlaid his existing steps, which cut the rise in half. After he passed away, we could just remove it and the stairs were back to normal.

 
stickshift's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 18,479
WI

12-17-16, 10:26 AM   #13  
Question answered, advice given and ignored. Why bother to ask in the first place....

 
Search this Thread