Can I remove this wall or do I need a beam?

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  #1  
Old 04-10-17, 01:52 PM
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Can I remove this wall or do I need a beam?

Thanks for any help with this. I want to remove the wall shown. I dont think I am concerned with the left side wall (as shown in pic), yet only with the one with the wiring through it. This will open this section of the house drastically. A few people looked at this and said they do not feel that its load bearing. the roof above includes an attic with plywood and a 3 ton ac air handler for cooling the entire home. There are also seasonal items stored on the opposite side of where said HVAC is located. Photos of the attic show wood cleats that join the rafters and joists together. the joists from front to rear are of two pieces, not lathed, but butted up against each other in a row at the wood cleats. Please let me know if you have any questions at all.

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The drawing shows roughly where the wall lines up to the joists above.
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Old 04-11-17, 02:07 AM
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It looks feasible but is difficult to answer with high confidence with just a few photos, no sense of wall location to rafters and other load/non load bearing walls.

I'd suggest a structural engineer or architect to review in person, dont want to make a mistake.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 04:07 AM
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The fact that you don't have engineered trusses makes the likelihood of the wall being load bearing greater.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 06:54 AM
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Can anyone tell me what type of truss system or roof frame this is referred to as?
 
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Old 04-11-17, 10:36 AM
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It looks to me like a site built rafter system, many of which utilize support from interior walls.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 11:20 AM
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The walls surrounding the kitchen area appear to have been an after-thought; with the trussed roof (King and Queen Posts) anticipating an open space below . . . . but I would still seek the guidance from a structural engineer or an architect.

If this is recent construction, I'd imagine you can still access the original building plans ? or the involved personnel ?
 
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Old 04-11-17, 11:45 AM
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If you want a name, I would call them substandard Frankenstein hillbilly trusses. Its almost certain that the roof rafters are bowed as well as ceiling joists. A true truss has triangular webbing which is where it gets its strength. If you remove the wall it will eventually sag even more.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 01:35 PM
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Vermont

"The walls surrounding the kitchen area appear to have been an after-thought; with the trussed roof (King and Queen Posts) anticipating an open space below . . . . but I would still seek the guidance from a structural engineer or an architect.

If this is recent construction, I'd imagine you can still access the original building plans ? or the involved personnel ?"

There are no queen posts.

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Old 04-11-17, 01:41 PM
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XSleeper

"If you want a name, I would call them substandard Frankenstein hillbilly trusses. Its almost certain that the roof rafters are bowed as well as ceiling joists. A true truss has triangular webbing which is where it gets its strength. If you remove the wall it will eventually sag even more."




Thanks for the useless information and the negative prognosis as well. Yes, I understand that its a site built frame, I understand what the definition of a truss is. From my research, I assume this is a king post design, or one based on that.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by muddust
". . . There are no queen posts . . ."
That's what I'm seeing in your fourth (4th) photo, half way out to the eaves.

Maybe that's where the Joists and the Rafters are both sandwiched between layers of plywood, and look like posts at this angle ?

The "drawing" neglects to show or describe whatever those vertical members are.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 03:10 PM
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Before you go off on me again, you might keep in mind that, as I pointed out, your trusses are substandard... they are horribly overspanned, and underbuilt. I dont know how this is useless information, as it is what you asked. Sorry if it isn't what you want to hear.

The areas where those "trusses" span 26' unsupported is almost certainly bowed. If you take the supporting wall out, that area will likely bow too. Thats my opinion.
 
 

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