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Repairing water-damaged header over slider


dnspade's Avatar
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06-12-17, 11:23 AM   #1  
Repairing water-damaged header over slider

Been a while and last major repair was similar; hoping to gain some insight. For the lack of a $10 piece of kick-out flashing and some really shoddy siding work, I have some gnarly water damage over the top corner of a slider. About 20% of the header is completely rotted away, but the rest is solid. The slider itself is mechanically functioning, but has some cosmetic damage. I will have to replace the pair of king studs to the left of the door, as well as OSB for about 12" back from the door. I will also be replacing the siding with taking care to provide an inch gap from the roofing (horrified that I paid someone to trace-cut shingle profiles - but was on the road)

Questions I'm struggling with:

1 - Is there an alternative to replacing the header? If not, is this a matter of building a temporary support wall just inside/parallel to the slider? Or is there a different technique (ideally not involving removal of the slider)

2 - What should I look for in determining whether to replace the slider itself?

3 - The rim joist has some minor damage in between joists. Joist themselves appear to be in ok shape - just remove the damaged area (which extends to the max about a 3rd of the depth) or splice in new piece of rim joist?

4 - How to flash the repair - will be cutting the gutter back so it stays off the siding, adding the kick-out flashing to the roof line, but it looks like one of the failings was leaving an open seam of tyvek behind the fascia board. How/what do I put in there?

Thank you - pictures to follow but wanted to get this out there while I wrote it.

 
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06-12-17, 12:23 PM   #2  
1. No, if it is no longer structurally sound, replace it. If the inside half is ok you might only replace the outer half. And assuming your ceiling joists are perpendicular to the header, yes... a temporary wall is needed.

2. Judgement call. Does it operate fine? Can it be sanded, patched and painted? And how much longer can you make it last?

3. If only 1/3 of joist depth is bad you might be able to leave it. Otherwise only cut out the bare minimum to replace rot.

4. Hard to say without seeing it. There should be L flashing where the fascia meets the wall in addition to the kick out directing water away. Pics will help.

 
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06-12-17, 08:41 PM   #3  
Pictures to illustrate my problem

Here are the pictures that best illustrate the problem.

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Last edited by PJmax; 06-12-17 at 10:27 PM. Reason: reoriented/spaced/enhanced pics
 
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06-13-17, 05:04 AM   #4  
Yeah, looks like you have your work cut out for ya. Be sure you detail the kick out correctly... it needs to be under any roof flashing under the shingles but over the last piece of siding. Might make sure the shingles are flashed to the wall correctly.

The door is surely affected but its up to you if you can make it last longer.

 
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06-13-17, 08:14 AM   #5  
Thanks XSleeper - followup questions

So have done the kick-out before and am good with that, but below the shingles there's the fascia and the gutter that is embedded at least into the siding. My gut tells me to cut them back away from the wall so they at least clear the siding, add a tyvek patch to cover any exposed seams to the tyvek and then slip some aluminum flashing over the tyvek but under the siding...is that needed?

Also, the temp wall- is ok just to force it against the carpet and drywall ceiling or do I have to expose the subfloor and the joists? Seems like a lot of compressibility...

 
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06-13-17, 05:36 PM   #6  
Yes, the temporary wall can go on the carpet and drywall. Use a double top plate, single bottom plate and wedge your studs in there tight. You only need to do this if you are replacing king studs, trimmers, and header.

On the exterior, you need to lap everything shingle style. It should be water tight before you even put any siding on.

So once you put your new sheathing on, tape the nailing fin to the tyvek on the sides with Pella window flashing tape. On top, the fin should be taped directly to the sheathing.

Before you start to put siding back on, I would advise you to back prime the siding with oil primer. Apply your siding up to the top of the door. Let's say that the top edge of that row of siding is 1 1/2" above the door. I would probably apply wide piece of metal flashing so it laps over the top edge of that siding. What this will do is let any water that gets in to leak out this spot instead of being trapped behind ALL the siding.

Your fascia needs to be cut back shorter... it should be notched to butt up to the siding, not the other way around.. Before you cover that area next to the fascia with siding, apply a piece of step flashing to the subfascia (behind the fascia). If water gets in behind the fascia, it will run down this corner flashing, onto the metal flashing mentioned above and out. Apply the next course of siding. Apply another step flashing to the subfascia if needed (it laps over the top edge of the piece of siding below it) then apply the next course of siding.

This should get you up over the fascia. Notch the fascia to fit over the lap siding and caulk the front, but leave the bottom open so it can weep if needed.

It would be nice if your drip edge had an upturned 90 degree bend where it meets the siding. That upturned edge on the drip edge should butt up to the siding. Your step flashing will be behind this piece of siding and under the drip edge it wI'll be notched since it will butt up to the drip edge on the left bUT shold extend up the wall higher on the right. (Another step flashing on the roof can extend over this to provide a longer drip edge if needed.) Seal the corner where those two flashings meet with clear roofing sealant before the sIding is applied.

Install your kickout under the 2nd piece of roof step flashing, it will shed onto the piece of siding at its termination, but will go behind the piece of siding above it. You can also make a vertical notch in the siding if needed and drop the siding above the kick out flashing down over it, then caulk both sides of that notch.

Putting a big piece of metal flashing over and around this tricky area is always a good idea. That way the tyvek won't get overwhelmed by water in case there is ever a leak.

And dear god please don't notch the gutter into the siding. The gutter should end 2" away from the siding so that you can get a caulking gun and a paint brush in there to paint the siding.

 
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