Floor damage due to A/C condensate

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Old 07-06-17, 06:59 PM
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Floor damage due to A/C condensate

We were starting to have " spongy" floors in the kitchen so I went in to the crawlspace and discovered extensive rot and dripping water. I cut open the condensate drain line of the air handler and found that it was plugged and condensate was overflowing the pan. I'm dealing with that and it's coming along nicely. I'm putting in a couple of unions so I can occasionally do a clean out and flush the drain line with the garden hose.

The big question is what do I do with the floor. Fortunately, the joists seem to be OK, but the rough flooring on the joists is pretty bad. some of those boards extend under a non supporting wall. And of course the particle board underlayment is toast in fairly large areas (10'X5' is the biggest I saw.) We were planning a minor remodeling of the kitchen anyway, but I don't have a clue about planning this project. Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Regards, Jim
 
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Old 07-06-17, 07:05 PM
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Soaked particle board should be replaced. Is there any chance that you can post pics?
 
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Old 07-06-17, 07:44 PM
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Thanks ShortyLong, that raises another question. Replace with what. There is a local thrift shop that has a large quantity of plywood that they are selling for $15. per sheet. I have a friend who is a woodworker and he is going to look at the plywood tomorrow to see if it's any good.

My biggest concern is the 1"X6" boards underneath the particle board that are rotten.
 
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Old 07-06-17, 07:54 PM
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The thrift shop sounds good. You won't know about the tongue & groove or whatever is under there until you remove the particle board.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 01:34 AM
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I have been in the crawl space and seen the 1X6" boards. Many of them are rotten. I tried to take some photos but they didn't turn out.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 03:46 AM
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Normally you just cut out the damaged wood and replace with new. It's fairly common to cut out 1x6s and replace it with the correct thickness of plywood.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 06:13 AM
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It sounds like you have to go down to the joists, no pics needed.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 07:45 AM
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Thanks guy's.
marksr, it sounds like you are saying that it is normal to eliminate the 1X6's all together by the use of additional plywood. Am I reading you correctly?

We just got back from our visit to the thrift shop and my friend approves of the plywood they have in stock. Based on the size of my kitchen, I will need about 9 sheets for a single layer, but if I use plywood to replace the 1X6's I will need 18 sheets.

On the other hand, If I just replace the rotten 1X6's with 1X6's, I will probably need to replace about 25% of them. This option would be a lot less expensive. Since budget is a big factor in this project, what would you suggest?

Shorty, I know that I will probably need to remove all of the particle board, but as I said to marksr, there is probably only 25% of the 1X6's that are rotten.

Thanks for the help. Regards, Jim
 
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Old 07-07-17, 07:49 AM
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Just replace the rotten 1 X 6 , No need to replace all. Will need right thickness plywood.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 11:18 AM
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Sometimes it's cheaper/easier to replace a section of 1x6s with plywood of the same thickness. No reason you can't go back with 1x6, just need to figure out which method will work best for you.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 10:38 AM
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I have more research to do. I just put a hole saw down through it and the core was 2" thick. I have not yet accounted for all that thickness.
 
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