Framing up a new basement

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  #1  
Old 07-07-17, 02:38 PM
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Framing up a new basement

Hello all, I've been searching the internet with little luck, so I thought I'd ask for some help. I'm framing the walls in a cinderblock basement with a concrete floor. I'm using 2x4 PT lumber as a sill and then construcing the wall framing on top of that. My question comes in at the top. The ceiling is drop ceiling, and though unattractive, it is quite functional for the space (home theater), and useful with the plumbing above it (master bath). My question is with stability and attachment. Do I need to some how secure the top of the wall or just build it to the height of the drop ceiling and use tape or what stripping or quarter round or something to make it attractive? The walls will be built up against the foam barrier between the cinderblock and the walls.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 02:56 PM
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I imagine that you plan to use drywall which is quite heavy. The frame of the hung ceiling isn't very strong. Would you consider paneling instead of drywall? Most people, especially women don't like it even if it's a light color. Since you walk alone, a woman's opinion doesn't matter, right?
 
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Old 07-07-17, 04:00 PM
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Your walls will be full height, attach your top plate to the bottom of the joists, or if joist are parallel to your wall, put perpendicular blocking inbetween the joists first so that you have something to nail your top plate to.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 06:12 PM
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The wall should be the full height but I was under the impression that the hung ceiling was already there.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 08:44 PM
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The drop ceiling needs to be taken down... perhaps not entirely, but enough to build the wall. If you had a laser to shoot your wall you could probably cut the grid (5/8" away from where the new framing will be) with a grinder where it hangs and then slip your wall angle in later after the drywall is up.

The walls get attached to the floor joists... not the drop ceiling grid.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 09:11 PM
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Yes the drop ceiling is already in position, and I will have to go with drywall because i jumped on a clearance sale and bought it already. hahaha. so can I build my framing into the floor joist and then just build the drywall itself to the height of the drop? perhaps by building in a faux-top plate to attach the drywall to and then continuing the framing to the joist?
 
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Old 07-08-17, 04:18 AM
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so can I build my framing into the floor joist and then just build the drywall itself to the height of the drop?
Nope, as mentioned the walls need to be secured both top and bottom, the ceiling then attaches to the walls.

Your trying to build walls without disturbing the ceiling and that is bass akwards.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 04:46 AM
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A sale on drywall? I never heard of it but okay.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 05:16 AM
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In commercial spaces if the very common to attach partition walls to the grid and drywall up to it. The only caveat is that the grid in commercial is likely of better quality and/or heavier duty. The studs are also steel studs with track on top and bottom.

Since you are framing out a wall next to the block, you could run the studs/top plate to the grid. Then attach blocking (2x4) to the block wall and nail the new wall to the blocking to secure it.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 06:31 AM
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Here is a nice page that helps explain why you drywall (and fireblock) the entire wall floor to ceiling, in accord with R302.11. We are assuming you have the same basic building codes as most other US cities, but check local codes. What is fire block? How do I install fire blocking for my basement?

If you did stop your drywall at the suspended ceiling you would need to fireblock your wall at the top of the drywall as illustrated in the first picture in the link above to slow a fire from spreading out of the wall cavity.

Commercial grid is more rigid and also has a fire rated ceiling above it.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 09:09 AM
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A local lumber distributor had sold drywall for a while, and recently decided to stop. They had about 20 pieces of 5/8 mmr type x 4x12 for 11 bucks a sheet.
 
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