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What is The best explanation to raising a sagging floor?

What is The best explanation to raising a sagging floor?


  #1  
Old 01-10-18, 08:40 PM
J
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Question What is The best explanation to raising a sagging floor?

Greetings,

Alright so my problem is as explained:
The entrance to the house is in the corner, which off to the left is the kitchen and in front of the door, has a staircase leading down to the basement. The floor around the entrance is slopped/sagging. I don't know by how much and don't know how much it should be to be level. We have floor jack columns in place, but from what I know is those are only temporary and should be replaced with concrete lally columns. As the jacks gears may give at any moment.

I watched a video of "This Old House" on YouTube, and they have explained a way on how to level a floor from the 2nd story, using a string, measured 4 feet up from the exterior wall to the center of the house (also 4 feet up from center). Then from the basement they jacked up until it was a tad bit over.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekYOBhO_1Oc

I am curious to know of what other ways may be good. Or so how would I use that string trick to level the corner of a house? Where does the 4 feet come from?

How do I even start, where do I begin? Is more so the questions.

If anything I will look into seeing if any where else in the house maybe off balanced.

Any thoughts and ideas would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

I will post pictures of the slope within a few days. Winter storm is currently in effect..
 
  #2  
Old 01-11-18, 01:47 AM
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A lot of unknowns, what is the current floor construction, some pictures are going to be needed!
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-18, 06:18 AM
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Where are you located? How old is the house?

You will have to go into the basement and determine the cause of the sag. It there a broken joist or beam? Has the foundation settled? Or was there simply not enough structure to support the weight?

You mentioned having lolly columns. Do they appear to be original to the house are more recent additions? Where are they located and what are they supporting? Is there a footer under the columns or are they just resting on concrete basement floor?
 
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Old 01-11-18, 02:03 PM
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These are the only photos I have on hand at the moment. I will get more when I have time. I don't know how old the house is. I'm located in Minnesota. The metal jacks you see, just got put there. Otherwise, it was only 3-4 wooden columns. Hopefully these images sorta show something, otherwise again, I will take better pictures of the whole floor and sag when I got time.

Thanks for the response!

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Last edited by PJmax; 01-11-18 at 06:24 PM. Reason: reoriented, cropped, enhanced & labeled picture
  #5  
Old 01-11-18, 06:25 PM
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I added numbers to the pictures as it makes it easier to discuss them.
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-18, 06:36 AM
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Thank you PJmax for numbering the photos.

We're going to need more information but from your pictures some of the "fixes" are better than others.

1. You need to figure out why they supported only that one floor joist and not the beam right at the end. Possibly the joist has become detached from the beam somehow. Normally in this situation you would support the beam.

2. Similar situation. Why support just that one joist and not the beam to the right that is supposed to be supporting the joist. It also appears the support beam has almost been completely cut in half by the installation of the heating duct.

3. This is really odd. There are no floor joists visible. We'll have to see more of the area to figure out what's really going on but normally the floor boards would be supported by joists running perpendicular to the floor boards.

4. It's a fix but probably one of the better ones. At least they got the supporting post/column underneath the beam.

5. Not a totally bad job. They got the lolly column underneath the beam but the top block is missing one member of the beam.

6. The best one of the bunch.

All of these "fixes" appear to have been in place a long time. DO NOT REMOVE any of them without thoroughly understanding why they were installed and how you plan to improve on the situation. How do all the columns look at the bottom where they meet the floor? Any signs of severe rusting or rot?

Where is your floor sagging problem in relation to these photos?
 
 

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