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old house, noticed a leak on "new" roof, rafter has shifted.

old house, noticed a leak on "new" roof, rafter has shifted.

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  #1  
Old 08-01-20, 07:49 AM
A
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old house, noticed a leak on "new" roof, rafter has shifted.


you can see the angle on the left

its separating from the ridge line

this kind of shows the angle.

so i noticed a leak recently. the roof shingles were replace a year or two ago by some random guys that didn't know what they were doing so we've had a few leaks due to misaligned shingles, so i figured that was the issue again and climbed onto the roof to try to patch bad looking spots with a bit of that roof tar stuff. but it didn't fix it, even after multiple attempts, and i've since noticed that the rafter supporting the planks where the leak is occurring is crooked.

the house is from the 30s, its always had roof sag as long as i've lived in it and not knowing anything about structural framing i figured it wasn't an issue. but this looks like my roof is going to colapse...

what can i do to fix this? i dont have the money to spend on a new roof from a company that'll make me pay out the nose so i'm hoping for suggestions.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-01-20, 09:02 AM
J
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Not likely that's what's causing the leak, but there is something wrong there, I'm not seeing a single toe nailed nail to hold the rafters in place.
Post some pictures up on the roof so we can see what your seeing.
And your right that roofing tar is never the way to repair shingles.
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-20, 09:25 AM
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i'm not sure what a toe nail is. there is one nail at least that i can see with a flashlight fastening it to the ridge board but i cant get much of a picture of it. its obvious that rafter isn't as loaded with them as a few others though.

as for the roof, these are pictures from the front of the house.





yes, i made a mess...

i figured it seems reasonable to assume the leak is because of the rafter instead of a misaligned shingle since its literally along the twisted rafter. i can see the nail in the attic that i'm pretty sure the water is coming in through where it goes into the rafter. but i cant see an exposed nail head on the roof itself and i'm fairly certain i've covered any seam it could have leaked through.

also i'm fairly certain the rafter has a bit of a wiggle, but i'm hesitant as hell to try jiggling it...
 
  #4  
Old 08-01-20, 02:02 PM
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The roof rafters have sheathing nailed to them as a base for the shingles. It doesn't appear your sheathing has any gaps between pieces. Therefore it is very unlikely a single roof rafter can move horizontally or vertically without affecting the whole side of the roof because of the sheathing. My guess is there is something affecting the dark singles that appear in the first photo causing a leak. Shingles should last 20 years or more and you state they are only 1-2 years old. Can you provide a photo of the sheathing from the inside where the dark shingles appear on the outside?
 
  #5  
Old 08-01-20, 04:47 PM
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the sheathing would be the planks running horizontally across the roof, crossing each rafter, yes?







best i can do with the camera and lighting i have. for reference, the white tape sits at a gap between two planks. that gap is where i believe the leak is originating. the plank "above" the tape doesn't get wet, the plank "below" it does.
 
  #6  
Old 08-01-20, 06:47 PM
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A toe nail is a nail driven in at an angle.
If it makes you feel better you could drive in blocking that would get the rafter to sit straighter and hold it in place but that not going to fix the real issue.
Just going to make a guess, did they just lay new shingle over the old shingles without removing the old ones?
Main reason I ask this is because it does not look like the shingles are laying flat and not sticking down.
I also noticed there's no ridge vent which is a big mistake.
My roof system looked almost exactly like yours and built about the same time before I had it redone.
Mine had also started leaking in the middle of the roof because some of the old sheathing boards had cracked.
I had all the shingles removed and went over the whole roof with with new 1/2" sheathing, new tar paper, new shingles and it's been fine for over 13 years.

 
  #7  
Old 08-01-20, 06:52 PM
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Sheathing is typically 4'X8' plywood/OSB but on a house as old as yours it looks to be 1 X 6? boards which is okay. Have you confirmed your roof has an underlayment under the shingles. This is what ensures your roof is waterproof more so than the shingles. Mis-aligned shingles in and of themselves will not cause a water leak. They will expose the underlayment causing it to be more easily damaged/worn which will cause a water leak.

Toenailing is a way of nailing two boards together driving the nail in at an angle, usually used when two boards meet at an angle. Your rafters meeting that (rather thin) ridge beam is where there does not seem to be many. The twisting of the beam should not cause a leak, unless a nail pulled through the sheathing and underlayment which I would think would be pretty difficult.

Lastly, water travels down. Just because you see the leak at that white tape doesn't mean the cause is directly above. The only way to make certain is to remove a bunch of the shingles and look for signs of the water travelling. On my roof the actual problem leak point was 15' to one side and 5 feet above where the water was penetrating the sheathing. You need to expose the (hopefully there) underlayment.
 
  #8  
Old 08-01-20, 07:46 PM
Z
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I'm far from the structural expert here, but although the roof may or may not be structurally sound, it really shouldn't affect the performance of the shingles. Unfortunately, I think you have two separate issues, one being that the roof/ridge board may not be built correctly, and 2, those shingles aren't installed correctly.

I would suggest getting a roofing contractor in to take a look at both issues. I would go more towards a bigger company as they should know about the roofing structure as well as the shingles. Or possibly more of a general contractor who can advise you on both items.
 
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